Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want the GUI to change the title of a button from "Go" to "Working..." before an object is instantiated and actually does the work. When finished, I want the title of the button to switch back to "Go."

Here's the code:

    private class convert implements ActionListener {
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
        JButton button = (JButton)e.getSource();

        button.setText("Working...");
        button.setEnabled(false);

        anObject name = new AnObject();
        boolean result = name.methodName(chooser.getSelectedFile(),encoding);

        // A bunch of stuff was here but irrelevant to the question,
        // so it was removed to save room.

        button.setEnabled(true);
        button.setText("Go");
    }

What actually happens in practise is name is instantiated, methodName gets called, and THEN the button gets updated on the screen, despite the fact that I have told the VM to change the button title first.

My working theory is, given I have not made this program threaded, this has something to do with operational priority, or internal threading of the JVM, or something...

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Another possible solution is if your "bunch of stuff irrelevent..." involves displaying another window and you're using a JFrame, use a modal JDialog instead. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 24 '11 at 13:32
1  
Also please see SwingWorker and AbstractAction solution that I've posted. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 24 '11 at 13:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I know that you've already accepted a solution, but since you are running into the "frozen gui" syndrome, you most definitely have a threading issue, and invokeLater won't solve your problem. As noted above by extraneon, you need a SwingWorker or some background thread to solve this. Also, I think that this is a good case for use of an AbstractAction rather than an ActionListener. For example:

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
public class Convert extends AbstractAction {
   private static final long SLEEP_TIME = 3000; // 3 seconds
   private String enabledText;
   private String disabledText;

   public Convert(String enabledText, String disabledText) {
      super(enabledText);
      this.enabledText = enabledText;
      this.disabledText = disabledText;
   }

   public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
      Object source = e.getSource();
      if (!(source instanceof JButton)) {
         return;
      }
      final JButton button = (JButton) source;
      setButtonEnabled(button, false);
      new SwingWorker<Void, Void>() {
         @Override
         protected Void doInBackground() throws Exception {
            // TODO: long-running code goes here. 
            // Emulated by Thread.sleep(...) 
            Thread.sleep(SLEEP_TIME);
            return null;
         }

         @Override
         protected void done() {
            setButtonEnabled(button, true);
         }
      }.execute();
   }

   public void setButtonEnabled(JButton button, boolean enabled) {
      if (enabled) {
         button.setText(enabledText);
         button.setEnabled(true);
      } else {
         button.setText(disabledText);
         button.setEnabled(false);
      }
   }

   private static void createAndShowUI() {
      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Convert");
      frame.getContentPane().add(new ConvertGui());
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowUI();
         }
      });
   }
}

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
class ConvertGui extends JPanel {
   public ConvertGui() {
      add(new JButton(new Convert("GO", "Working...")));
   }

   @Override
   public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
      return new Dimension(300, 200);
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, Yes yes yes! I don't understand why OP thinks the accepted answer is right! It's not! –  Moonbeam Jul 24 '11 at 13:54
    
If invokeLater is called from the event dispatching thread -- for example, from a JButton's ActionListener -- the doRun.run() will still be deferred until all pending events have been processed. Note that if the doRun.run() throws an uncaught exception the event dispatching thread will unwind (not the current thread). –  user802421 Jul 24 '11 at 13:57
    
I accepted the answer because, when I implemented the solution, it worked. That said, if there's an issue with it, then it's good to know; as extraneon posted in the comments. –  Steven C. Britton Jul 24 '11 at 13:58
    
I didn't say that user802421's answer was wrong, and in fact I up-voted it before making this post. All I'm saying is that if you have a frozen GUI, then you have a threading issue and will require the use of a background thread. Edit: also as Paul Tomblin notes -- 1+ for his answer. :) –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 24 '11 at 14:00
2  
Jeanette (kleopatra), one of the Swing gurus says that you should always use Actions rather than ActionListeners, but I don't recall her rationale. My motivation for using Actions is that you're changing the title of the button, and the AbstractAction will do that for you initially (in the super call in my Convert constructor). It also allows you to create a JButton with its behavior and title in one line of code: add(new JButton(new Convert("GO", "Working..."))); –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jul 24 '11 at 14:55

An "ActionPerformed" callback occurs in the event thread, and generally nothing on the GUI will update until it returns. If you want to update the gui, do something, and then update it again, you will need to update the gui and spawn a thread and return. The thread will then have to do it's action, and then do a SwingUtilities.invokeLater to update the gui.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the explanation. It's a nice add-on to the code suggested above, and explains why it's needed. :) –  Steven C. Britton Jul 24 '11 at 13:26
    
+1, Correct approach. –  Moonbeam Jul 24 '11 at 13:53

Try SwingUtilities.invokeLater().

private class convert implements ActionListener {
public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
    final JButton button = (JButton)e.getSource();

    button.setText("Working...");
    button.setEnabled(false);

    javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            anObject name = new AnObject();
            boolean result = name.methodName(chooser.getSelectedFile(),encoding);

            // A bunch of stuff was here but irrelevant to the question,
            // so it was removed to save room.

            button.setEnabled(true);
            button.setText("Convert");
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Please note that this runs in the EDT - if methodName takes a long time your app will freeze. Use a SwingWorker if you have a long-running job, and update the title bar in the done() method. –  extraneon Jul 24 '11 at 13:23
    
+1 for extraneon. –  user802421 Jul 24 '11 at 13:24
    
That solved it, thank you! Fairly new to Java, so I'm still learning some of the quirks such as this one. –  Steven C. Britton Jul 24 '11 at 13:25
    
@extraneon - thanks also. Given that the length of operation is dependent on the length of the file methodName is working on, I may need to implement your suggestion. I wonder how long a "long-running job" is... ;) –  Steven C. Britton Jul 24 '11 at 13:28
    
-1, This is just wrong. In this example, you're already in the EDT when you use SwingUtilities. –  Moonbeam Jul 24 '11 at 13:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.