Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a goroutine that calls a method, and passes returned value on a channel:

ch := make(chan int, 100)
go func(){
    for {
        ch <- do_stuff()
    }
}()

How do I stop such a goroutine?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

EDIT: I wrote this answer up in haste, before realizing that your question is about sending values to a chan inside a goroutine. The approach below can be used either with an additional chan as suggested above, or using the fact that the chan you have already is bi-directional, you can use just the one...

If your goroutine exists solely to process the items coming out of the chan, you can make use of the "close" builtin and the special recieve form for channels.

That is, once you're done sending items on the chan, you close it. Then inside your goroutine you get an extra parameter to the receive operator that shows whether the channel has been closed.

Here is a complete example (the waitgroup is used to make sure that the process continues until the goroutine completes):

package main

import "sync"
func main() {
    var wg sync.WaitGroup
    wg.Add(1)

    ch := make(chan int)
    go func() {
        for {
            foo, ok := <- ch
            if !ok {
                println("done")
                wg.Done()
                return
            }
            println(foo)
        }
    }()
    ch <- 1
    ch <- 2
    ch <- 3
    close(ch)

    wg.Wait()
}
share|improve this answer

Typically, you pass the goroutine a (possibly separate) signal channel. That signal channel is used to push a value into when you want the goroutine to stop. The goroutine polls that channel regularly. As soon as it detects a signal, it quits.

quit := make(chan bool)
go func() {
    for {
        select {
        case <- quit:
            return
        default:
            // Do other stuff
        }
    }
}()

// Do stuff

// Quit goroutine
quit <- true
share|improve this answer
5  
Not good enough. What if the goroutine is stuck in an endless loop, due to a bug? –  Elazar Leibovich Jul 26 '11 at 11:39
54  
Then the bug should be fixed. –  jimt Jul 26 '11 at 20:51
7  
but while you're fixing the bug, all your customers are cursing you. Heard of "defense in depth"? I hope the OS you'll design won't leave file descriptor of a closed process open, saying "the program should have closed them on exit, I wouldn't do that, fix the bug there!" –  Elazar Leibovich Jul 27 '11 at 6:23
8  
Elazar, What you suggest is a way to stop a function after you've called it. A goroutine is not a thread. It may run in a different thread or it may run in the same thread as yours. I know of no language that supports what you seem to think Go should support. –  Jeremy Wall Jul 30 '11 at 5:23
4  
Go multitasking is cooperative, not preemptive. A goroutine in a loop never enters the scheduler, so it can never be killed. –  Jeff Allen Aug 28 '12 at 14:42

You can't kill a goroutine from outside. You can signal a goroutine to stop using a channel, but there's no handle on goroutines to do any sort of meta management. Goroutines are intended to cooperatively solve problems, so killing one that is misbehaving would almost never be an adequate response. If you want isolation for robustness, you probably want a process.

share|improve this answer
    
And you might want to look into the encoding/gob package, which would let two Go programs easily exchange data structures over a pipe. –  Jeff Allen Aug 28 '12 at 14:45

I know this answer has already been accepted, but I thought I'd throw my 2cents in. I like to use the tomb package. It's basically a suped up quit channel, but it does nice things like pass back any errors as well. The routine under control still has the responsibility of checking for remote kill signals. Afaik it's not possible to get an "id" of a goroutine and kill it if it's misbehaving (ie: stuck in an infinite loop).

Here's a simple example which I tested:

package main

import (
  "launchpad.net/tomb"
  "time"
  "fmt"
)

type Proc struct {
  Tomb tomb.Tomb
}

func (proc *Proc) Exec() {
  defer proc.Tomb.Done() // Must call only once
  for {
    select {
    case <-proc.Tomb.Dying():
      return
    default:
      time.Sleep(300 * time.Millisecond)
      fmt.Println("Loop the loop")
    }
  }
}

func main() {
  proc := &Proc{}
  go proc.Exec()
  time.Sleep(1 * time.Second)
  proc.Tomb.Kill(fmt.Errorf("Death from above"))
  err := proc.Tomb.Wait() // Will return the error that killed the proc
  fmt.Println(err)
}

The output should look like:

# Loop the loop
# Loop the loop
# Loop the loop
# Loop the loop
# Death from above
share|improve this answer

Personally, I'd like to use range on a channel in a goroutine:

http://play.golang.org/p/KjG8FLzPoz

Dave has written a great post about this: http://dave.cheney.net/2013/04/30/curious-channels.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.