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I am trying to write a simple jQuery plugin just to see how its done. But i cant seem to run it twice simultaneously. Its basically a count down and all it does is get the text() value in a div and count it down until it reaches 1.

$('#box1').startCounter();
$('#box2').startCounter();

This call changes both this variables inside the function to point to #box2. Here is my jsfiddle

Its pretty confusing how this changes around in a jQuery plugin. thanks for any help :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You defined $this in global scope, so when startCount is called on the second element, the value is overwritten. Use var to make it local:

var $this = this;

DEMO


Instead of invoking the function again the element, you could also do something like this:

$.fn.startCount = function(count, div) {
    count = (count) ? count : parseInt($('span.no-display',this).text());
    var $target =  $('div.counter', this);

    var run = function() {
        if (count <= 1) {
            this.fadeOut().mouseout();
        }       
        else {
            count--;
            $target.text(count);
            setTimeout(run, 1000);
        }
    };
    run();
}

DEMO 2


And to make your plugin work in environments where $ does not refer to jQuery (jQuery.noConflict()), you should do:

(function($) {
    $.fn.startCount = ...
}(jQuery)); 
share|improve this answer
    
god damit! It ought to be the other way round. thanks :) –  shxfee Jul 24 '11 at 17:17
    
@Shafee besides thanking you can: a) upvote this answer b) mark it as the accepted one. I recommend you do both –  Pablo Fernandez Jul 24 '11 at 17:19
    
yehh :D Also could you please explain to me why i need to make a copy of this into $this for it to work? jsfiddle.net/CzyNG/16 –  shxfee Jul 24 '11 at 17:27
1  
@Shafee: Because this is special and the value of it depends on how the function was called. Every function has it's own this (in a way). Inside the setTimeout callback, this will refer to window. –  Felix Kling Jul 24 '11 at 21:45
    
got it :) thanks again. –  shxfee Jul 25 '11 at 4:27

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