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Which one can gain a better performance?

Example 1

 #pragma omp parallel for private (i,j)
    for(i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        for (j=0; j< 100; j++){
           ....do sth...
        }
    }

Example 2

   for(i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        #pragma omp parallel for private (i,j)
        for (j=0; j< 100; j++){
           ....do sth...
        }
    }

Follow up question Is it valid to use Example 3?

 #pragma omp parallel for private (i)
   for(i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
        #pragma omp parallel for private (j)
        for (j=0; j< 100; j++){
           ....do sth...
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Depends on what you're doing inside those loops; and whether you have >100 CPU cores. –  larsmans Jul 24 '11 at 17:18
    
does the no. of core matters? –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 17:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general, Example 1 is the best as it parallelizes the outer most loop, which minimizes thread fork/join overhead. Although many OpenMP implementations pre-allocate the thread pool, there are still overhead to dispatch logical tasks to worker threads (a.k.a. a team of thread) and join them. Also note that when you use a dynamic scheduling (e.g., schedule(dynamic, 1)), then this task dispatch overhead would be problematic.

So, Example 2 may incur significant parallel overhead, especially when the trip count of for-i is large (100 is okay, though), and the amount of workload of for-j is small. Small may be an ambiguous term and depends on many variables. But, less than 1 millisecond would be definitely wasteful to use OpenMP.

However, in case where the for-i is not parallelizable and only for-j is parallelizable, then Example2 is the only option. In this case, you must consider carefully whether the amount of parallel workload can offset the parallel overhead.

Example3 is perfectly valid once for-i and for-j are safely parallelizable (i.e., no loop-carried flow dependences in each two loops, respectively). Example3 is called nested parallelism. You may take a look this article. Nested parallelism should be used with care. In many OpenMP implementations, you need to manually turn on nested parallelism by calling omp_set_nested. However, as nested parallelism may spawn huge number of threads, its benefit may be significantly reduced.

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Thanks for the detailed answer. Just a follow up question, how do we define if a for loop is parallelizable or not? Can we say if there is dependency between item[i] and item[i+n], where n is >0 and < max(items), then it is not paralleizable? –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 17:40
    
Judging parallelizability is actually very hard. For example, matrix multiplication is perfectly parallelizable, but in many case, it's hard to judge parallelizability. In the lowest level, a loop must not have loop-carried dependences. However, loop-carried output and anti- dependences can be easily removable. Also, even for loop-carried flow dependences, sometimes they can be easily avoided, notably by using reduction operators. I can't say everything in this short comment. –  minjang Jul 24 '11 at 17:49
    
"Can we say if there is dependency between item[i] and item[i+n], where n is >0 and < max(items), then it is not paralleizable?" It depends. If the dependence type is flow dependence, i.e., there are reads after writes on the same location, you can't simply parallelize the loop. In a particular case, you may parallelize by pipeline parallelism, but it's hard to explain in here. for (int i = 1; i < N; ++i) A[i] = A[i-1] + 1; // Loop-carried flow dependences –  minjang Jul 24 '11 at 17:51
    
However, for (int i = 0; i < N-1; ++i) A[i] = A[i+1] + 1; it only shows loop-carred anti-dependence. It can be easily removed by using temporary arrays. –  minjang Jul 24 '11 at 17:52
    
I think I understand what is loop-carried flow dependences now. Thanks for the answer and explanation. There are still some of the terms not quite understand, well I try to google first –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 18:00

It depends on the amount your doing in the inner loop. If it's small, lauching too many threads will represent a overhead. If the work is big, I would probabaly go with option 2, depending on the number of cores your machines has.

BTW, the only place where you need to flag a variable as private is "j" in example 1. In all the other cases it's implicit.

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In example, i think variable j should also be set private –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 17:21
    
Btw, is example 3 valid? –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 17:21
    
Can you explain me more why you go option2 is the work is big? Because the situation is exactly what i met. However, i am afraid that it would spawn too much threads which influence the performance. –  Kit Ho Jul 24 '11 at 17:23
    
It has been a while since a I used openMP but I'm pretty sure that only in example 1 you have to flag variable "j" as private. In example 2, "j" in implicitly private and all threads join before the next iteration of the outer loop. In example 3, it is again implicit. But anyway, check what I'm saying. Example 3 is valid. It's nested parallelism. You have to enable the support for it, as @minjang says with the omp_set_nested method. The typical overhead of nested parallelism is very high so use it with caution. In example 3 you want to start 10000 threads... –  João Fernandes Jul 24 '11 at 17:33
    
If both loops are parallelizable, Example1 will always give better speedup than Example2. You always should parallelize an outer loop as much as you can. Example1 and Example2 both will create N threads, where N is the number of logical processors. –  minjang Jul 24 '11 at 17:40

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