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I am new to C and C++ and I need help with arrays. I have an array initialized to zero with 500 elements(myDataBinary). Now I have one more array ith values in it say 1,2,3....Now by reading the values (1,2,3...) from(my_data[10]) i want to make the corresponding elements in myDataBinary "1" and rest should be "0". I have written the below code to achieve this, but I am getting some segmentation fault and not able to see the proper results. Any help on this would be appreciated. Thanks in advance

     int my_data[10] = {1,3,9,10};
     int myDataBinary[500] = {0};
     int index;
     for(int i=0; i<sizeof(my_data);i++)
      {
        index = my_data[i]; 
        myDataBinary[index] = 1;
        printf("rec data %d = %d\n",index,myDataBinary[index]);

      }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

sizeof operator gives the size of an object (or type) in bytes. The canonical way to determine the number of elements in an array x is:

sizeof x / sizeof x[0]

This does not depend upon knowing the type of the elements of x, and will work even if you change it. sizeof my_data / sizeof(int) doesn't have that property.

Note that my_data has to be an array, it cannot be a pointer. This is important because in many contexts (when passed to a function for example), the name of an array decays to a pointer, so the following "won't work":

void f(int *data)
{
    printf("%zu\n", sizeof data);
}

int main(void)
{
    int my_data[10] = {1,3,9,10};
    printf("%zu\n", sizeof my_data);
    f(my_data);
    return 0;
}

The above program will print two different values (unless sizeof(int)*10 == sizeof(int *)).

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sizeof(my_data) returns the total size of the array in bytes, not the number of elements.

Since ints are (usually) 2 bytes wide, you're ending up outside the array.

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3  
It's probably a little misleading saying "usually". On my system (x86), they are 4 bytes. –  someguy Jul 24 '11 at 18:30
    
One can still get around this by writing sizeof(my_data) / sizeof(int) (assuming that my_data is, and will always be, an array of ints). –  Tamás Jul 24 '11 at 18:31
    
@SLaks: I was reading, how to determine the no of elements in arrays, but it seems only For statically allocated arrays, we can use something like this sizeof(array)/sizeof(type of array); Any ideas?? –  user537670 Jul 24 '11 at 18:34
1  
@Tamas: it will always be an array of int. –  user537670 Jul 24 '11 at 18:35
    
@user537670 Your array is statically allocated. For dynamically-allocated arrays, you would have to store the size. Or, in C++, you can use a vector, which is usually more sensible than using C-style arrays anyway. –  someguy Jul 24 '11 at 18:49

Replace sizeof(my_data) in the for loop with sizeof(my_data)/sizeof(int) and try again.

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Don't use sizeof(my_data) - this doesn't give you what you want. To find the number of the elements you can do int n = sizeof(my_data) / sizeof(int):

 int my_data[10] = {1,3,9,10};
 int myDataBinary[500] = {0};
 int index;
 int n = sizeof(my_data) / sizeof(int);
 for(int i=0; i<n;i++)
  {
    index = my_data[i]; 
    myDataBinary[index] = 1;
    printf("rec data %d = %d\n",index,myDataBinary[index]);

  }
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