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The problem this: at the end of this function, the members of the element at "tasks[taskCount]" like name, due date, etc, are indeed what was passed into this function, but after returning to this function's caller, all those values become garbage, except taskcount, which is not dynamic. This function is defined within the scope of class, "Tasklist"

void addTask(char name[],char course[],char dueDate[]){
    taskCount++;
    Task task(taskCount, name, course, dueDate);
    tasks[taskCount] = task;
}

Here is the brief definition for class "Task":

class Task
{
private:
    int number;
    char* name;
    char* dueDate;
    char* course;
public:
    Task(){
        name = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
        dueDate = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
        course = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
        saveText = new char[(TEXT_SIZE * 3) + 1];
    };

    Task(int num, char n[], char c[], char d[]){
        number = num;
        name = new char[strlen(n) + 1];
        dueDate = new char[strlen(d) + 1];
        course = new char[strlen(c) + 1];

        strcpy(name, n);
        strcpy(dueDate, d);
        strcpy(course, c);
    };

    ~Task(){
        delete [] name;
        delete [] dueDate;
        delete [] course;
        delete [] saveText;
    }
};

I'm pretty sure what is happening is that this function is disposing of its locally declared variable "task" after returning to the caller, which invokes task's destructor thereby deallocating the memory that the "tasks" array was referencing for each of it's element's members (name, due, course).

So, how do I prevent this from happening?

So by the advice of the many helpful people on this site, I now have this in my Task class definition:

Task(const Task& t){
    name = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
    dueDate = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
    course = new char[TEXT_SIZE + 1];
    saveText = new char[(TEXT_SIZE * 3) + 1];

    number = t.number;
    strcpy(name, t.name);
    strcpy(dueDate, t.dueDate);
    strcpy(course, t.course);
    strcpy(saveText, t.saveText);
}

So this should account for one of the rule of three, right?

share|improve this question
5  
Use std::string. – GManNickG Jul 24 '11 at 20:03
    
It might help to mention that the string members of class "Task" are defined as such: – Colten J Nye Jul 24 '11 at 20:03
    
What? Did your comment get cut off? – GManNickG Jul 24 '11 at 20:53
    
Use a std::string. If you are still fiddling with the rule of three you are missing: Task& operator=(Task t) { swap(number, t.number); swap(name, t.name); swap(dueDate, t.dueDate); swap(course, t.course); swap(saveText, t.saveText); return *this;} – Loki Astari Jul 24 '11 at 23:52
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should use std::string instead of char * and let C++ handle allocation for you. No need to call operator new[], strcpy(), or operator delete[] when these operations have a better interface in the form of std::string.

If you cannot use std::string, then you need to implement a copy constructor for Task that takes a const Task& as its only argument, and an assignment operator that does roughly the same thing. This constructor will then be implicitly used by your code when copying a Task object into an array or other place:

Task::Task(const Task& t) {
    ...
}

Task& Task::operator =(const Task& t) {
    if (this != &t) {
        ...
    }
    return *this;
}

(These two members tend to have very similar implementations. Factoring out the common code is an exercise for the reader.)

share|improve this answer
    
The rule of three says that you also have to implement the assignment operator, in addition to the copy constructor. Granted, the copy constructor alone will solve the OP's immediate problem, but it's all about thinking about the longer term. ;-) – Chris Jester-Young Jul 24 '11 at 20:05
    
Bingo. It was the copy constructor. Thank you thank you thank you!! – Colten J Nye Jul 24 '11 at 20:38
1  
@Colten: Don't do this. Use std::string for your members and let the compiler make the copy-constructor. If someone asks what your class does, you should always be able to reply with a single thing, but now you can't: it handles the management of a string and does some other stuff. Bad. – GManNickG Jul 24 '11 at 20:55
    
@GMan Which my post also mentioned--std::string is generally preferred, but at the same time a complex class will need the big three implemented--and simply saying "use std::string" won't explain why there's a problem, it'll just defer it to STL. – Jonathan Grynspan Jul 24 '11 at 22:27
1  
@Jonathan Grynspan: Also doing it this way hides the complexity that you have three dynamically allcoated objects. And you have not taken into account how a failure in any one will affect the other two. Defining the copy constrctor and assingment operator for a class that contains more than one pointer is a just bad design. If you want to show him how it is done you should have broken the allocation/de-allocation into another class than handled one pointer then used this object inside task. doing that would have also made it much more obvious this is already done by std::string. – Loki Astari Jul 24 '11 at 23:57

You are violating the rule of three, by not writing a copy constructor that provides proper deep-copy semantics to your Task type.

share|improve this answer
    
But he should also split out resource management from business logic aka separation of concerns; implementing rule of 3 for objects with more than one owned pointer is a bad idea. – Loki Astari Jul 25 '11 at 4:26

Have you properely overloaded copy constructor and assignment operator?

You have to create a new copy of those strings.

share|improve this answer
    
I think answer should look like an answer, i.e. without the question mark, I suppose you're correct and you know it, so should be a bit more confident :) – unkulunkulu Jul 24 '11 at 20:05
    
@unkulunkulu: There is nothing wrong with a rhetorical question as an answer. – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 24 '11 at 20:10

You need to implement the "rule of three". That means that any time you have a constructor that creates resources and a destructor that frees them, you also need to create a copy constructor and an assignment operator that copies these resources properly too.

Right now, you don't have a copy constructor or an assignment operator, so those items are not getting copied.

share|improve this answer

I'm pretty rusty at C++, but it looks like Task is allocated on the stack, not on the heap, so when task goes out of scope, it's unallocated.

share|improve this answer

You are on the right track that the locally declared variable task is destroyed and then the memory is freed.

The problem is that this line:

tasks[taskCount] = task;

makes a copy of the Task object, probably by using the default copy constructor of the Taskclass. The default copy constructor only copies the pointer values, it does not allocate new memory like your constructor does. So you now have to objects, referring to the same memory and when the first one is destructed it frees the memory.

To remedy this:

  1. Use the std::string class instead of storing strings in hand-allocated buffers. Using the std::string class is the C++ way of doing this. char* is the C way, which shouldn't be used in C++ code.
  2. When dealing with dynamically allocated memory, use smart pointers such as tr1::shared_ptr that will take care of deallocation for you - deallocating when the last pointer to the memory block is released.
share|improve this answer
    
That makes sense! Unfortunately, this is an assignment in a class that we cannot use the std::string class. I will review my course content on shallow copy vs deep copy to see if that gets me anywhere. – Colten J Nye Jul 24 '11 at 20:14
    
In that case it is the rule of three that you have to look at, like others have suggested. – Anders Abel Jul 24 '11 at 20:19
Task task(taskCount, name, course, dueDate);
    tasks[taskCount] = task;

You are allocating a temporary variable on the stack which you copy by value into the array, then C++ deallocates the temporary variable since it was allocated on the stack. This means that those char[] pointers inside the object become dangling pointers - they no longer point to valid stuff.

Either use std::string instead of char[] arrays, they are copied by value instead of by pointer, or modify your tasks array to contain Task* pointers (e.g. std::vector<Task*>):

    tasks[taskCount] = new Task(taskCount, name, course, dueDate);

Edit: Or as others have pointed out, write a copy constructor and an assignment operator if you wanna copy by value a class which contains pointers. I recommend the std::string approach though, it is much simpler.

share|improve this answer

Forward: Use std::string. Please. Pretty please. Doing your own memory management is going to end in tears, I promise.

Let's annotate your addTask function

void addTask(char name[],char course[],char dueDate[])
{
    taskCount++;
    Task task(taskCount, name, course, dueDate); <--- Object 'task' created on the stack
    tasks[taskCount] = task;                     <--- Task::operator=(const Task&)
}                                                <--- Ojbect 'task' destroyed

The interesting thing is to look at Task::operator=(const Task&), that does a bitwise copy of your Task object. Unless you explicitly specified it, it looks like this:

class Task {
    char *name, *course, *dueDate;
    /* other stuff */

    /* Provided automatically by the compiler if you don't specify it */
    Task(const Task& rsh) {
        this->name = rhs.name;
        this->course = rhs.course;
        this->dueDate = rhs.dueDate;
    }

    Task& operator=(const Task& rhs) {
        this->name = rhs.name;
        this->course = rhs.course;
        this->dueDate = rhs.dueDate;
    }
};

So you can see the problem -- the operator= is just copying the pointer to the char[] arrays, not the entire arrays. When the array gets destroyed, the pointer to them is not fixed. Because you are using manual memory management, you must explicitly write your own operator= and copy contstructor that does a "deep copy" versus a "shallow copy".

Task::Task(const Task& rhs) {
    this->number = rhs.number;
    this->name = new char[ strlen(rhs.name) ];
    strcopy(this->name, rhs.name);
    /* ... for other char* in the class  ... */
}

Task::operator=(const Task& rhs) {
    this->number = rhs.number;
    if ( NULL != name ) { // note, if you have a default ctor, i.e. Task::Task(), make sure it initializes char*s to NULL
        delete[] name; // otherwise you will crash when you delete unallocated memory
    }
    this->name = new char[ strlen(rhs.name) ];
    strcopy(this->name, rhs.name);

    /* ... for other char* in the class  ... */
}

This is why manual memory management blows!

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, unfortunately, it is a requirement for the assignment. However, you are absolutely right, I have implemented a copy constructor and it runs smoothly now. Thanks! – Colten J Nye Jul 24 '11 at 20:43

Your copy constructor looks fine. You need to create the Task item on the heap, not on the stack. I'm not sure where or how the tasks array is defined, but it needs to be something like this:

Task* tasks[100];

void addTask(char name[],char course[],char dueDate[]){
    Task* task = new Task(taskCount, name, course, dueDate);
    tasks[taskCount] = task;
    taskCount++;
}

 ~Task(){
    delete name;
    delete dueDate;
    delete course;
    if (saveText != NULL){
        delete saveText;
    }
}

Now you need a good spot to do call a cleanup method that will do something like:

void cleanupTasks() {
    for (int i = 0; i < taskCount; i++){
        delete tasks[i];
    }
}

Note that you're not doing anything with saveText in your copy constructor. I'm not sure what this is, but you need to handle it like the other members. I put in a hack in the destructor to illustrate the problem, heh. I'd assign it to NULL in the copy constructor.

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