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I have this

$content1="W've have come across";
$content2="W've have come across all the oceans but still we don't find anything";

I have to strip out the content between "We've have come across" and "anything"

What kind of regex should I use when the content1,content2 can change but they may contain apostrophe's or special characters?

How to use preg_match when you have special characters?

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Will each $content always start with "We've have come across" and end with "anything"? What is the expected output from $content1 listed above? –  sberry Jul 24 '11 at 22:41
1  
Why don't you use str_replace() to replace known substrings? –  Tomalak Jul 24 '11 at 22:42
    
The content doesn't start with "We've come across" It may contain special characters or may not.. str_replace - whether there is anyway to replace all the known special characters?because sometimes the content might be in UTF-8 encoding also :( –  Shan Jul 24 '11 at 22:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

preg_quote should help you, but as @Tomalak said -- why don't you want to use str_replace or something simple (not regexps)?

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I want to match the characters and not replace it.. –  Shan Jul 24 '11 at 22:51

I use something like this:

function escape_regexp($regexp)
{
        $regex_chars = '^.[]$()|*+?{}' . "\\";
        $regexp = addcslashes($regexp, $regex_chars);

        return $regexp;
}

and then e.g. call:

preg_replace('/something' . escape_regexp($var1) . 
    'something else/', '', $string)

I didn't use preg_quote() because I wanted function for general regexp escaping, not just for PHP, but also for mysql. I wanted a different character set. I didn't want charactes < and > to be escaped - I didn't find reason for escaping them.

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Whether we can use the same thing for preg_match also? –  Shan Jul 24 '11 at 22:52
    
of course! I also used it for escaping the regexp for mysql! Also note that I didn't use preg_quote because the character set escaped by this function was slightly different. However my character set stems directly from PHP regexp documentation. –  TMS Jul 24 '11 at 23:26
    
@Tomas, why dont' you use standard preg_quote ? –  gaRex Jul 25 '11 at 11:38
1  
As I explained - because I use it for general regexp escaping, not just for PHP, but also for mysql. I wanted a different character set. I didn't want charactes < and > to be escaped - there's no reason to escape them. –  TMS Jul 25 '11 at 11:47

Without regexp, I'd use this :

function weirdExtract($str, $start, $end){
    $posa = strripos($str, $start);
    $posb = strripos($str, $end);
    if($posa === false || $posb === false) return '';
    $startlen = strlen($start);
    return substr($str, $posa + $startlen, $posb - $startlen);
}

Used like this : http://codepad.viper-7.com/BJmEGG

strripos() can be changed with the appropriate function if case is important.

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