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I want to take an integer and get its ordinal, i.e.:

1 -> "First"
2 -> "Second"
3 -> "Third"
...
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4  
1  
It would be neat if it could do prefixes as well... st,nd,rd – Andrew White Jul 24 '11 at 23:06
    
Note that if you want your program to be used outside your own country, you should be careful to use a solution which can be localized. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 24 '11 at 23:42
up vote 47 down vote accepted

If you're OK with "1st", "2nd", "3rd" etc, here's some simple code that will correctly handle any integer:

public static String ordinal(int i) {
    String[] sufixes = new String[] { "th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th" };
    switch (i % 100) {
    case 11:
    case 12:
    case 13:
        return i + "th";
    default:
        return i + sufixes[i % 10];

    }
}

Here's some tests for edge cases:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int[] edgeCases = { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 111, 112, 113, 114 };
    for (int edgeCase : edgeCases) {
        System.out.println(ordinal(edgeCase));
    }
}

Output:

0th
1st
2nd
3rd
4th
5th
10th
11th
12th
13th
14th
20th
21st
22nd
23rd
24th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
111th
112th
113th
114th
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Here is code for such a conversion and here is another. And look at this answers How to convert number to words in java

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2  
That code is for cardinal numbers (one, two, three), not for ordinal ones (first, second, third), though. – Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 25 '11 at 15:45
1  
right, but it's trivial to change it, I think – zacheusz Jul 25 '11 at 15:55

In 1 line:

public static String ordinal(int i) {
    return i % 100 == 11 || i % 100 == 12 || i % 100 == 13 ? i + "th" : i + new String[]{"th", "st", "nd", "rd", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th", "th"}[i % 10];
}
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Another solution

public static String ordinal(int i) {
    int mod100 = i % 100;
    int mod10 = i % 10;
    if(mod10 == 1 && mod100 != 11) {
        return i + "st";
    } else if(mod10 == 2 && mod100 != 12) {
        return i + "nd";
    } else if(mod10 == 3 && mod100 != 13) {
        return i + "rd";
    } else {
        return i + "th";
    }
}

Pro: does not require an array to be initialized (less garbage)
Con: not a one-liner...

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Using the excellent ICU4J (there's also an excellent C version) you can also do this and get the Ordinals as plain words;

RuleBasedNumberFormat nf = new RuleBasedNumberFormat(Locale.UK, RuleBasedNumberFormat.SPELLOUT);
for(int i = 0; i <= 30; i++)
{
    System.out.println(i + " -> "+nf.format(i, "%spellout-ordinal"));
}

for example produces

0 -> zeroth
1 -> first
2 -> second
3 -> third
4 -> fourth
5 -> fifth
6 -> sixth
7 -> seventh
8 -> eighth
9 -> ninth
10 -> tenth
11 -> eleventh
12 -> twelfth
13 -> thirteenth
14 -> fourteenth
15 -> fifteenth
16 -> sixteenth
17 -> seventeenth
18 -> eighteenth
19 -> nineteenth
20 -> twentieth
21 -> twenty-first
22 -> twenty-second
23 -> twenty-third
24 -> twenty-fourth
25 -> twenty-fifth
26 -> twenty-sixth
27 -> twenty-seventh
28 -> twenty-eighth
29 -> twenty-ninth
30 -> thirtieth
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