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So I know there is this question addressing the need for getting the bytes of an object. But I am wondering if there is an approach to calling BitConverter.GetBytes on a generic type where I know the type is a primitive (Int32, UInt16, etc).

Because people love silly examples as a prerequisite to actually answering questions here:

Public Sub Foobar(Of T as Structure)()
    Dim x as T 'Assume T is declared as Int32
    Dim y() as Byte

    y = System.BitConverter.GetBytes(x)
End Sub


The above will throw your usual error:

Overload resolution failed because no accessible 'GetBytes' can be called with these arguments:
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Double) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Double'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Single) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Single'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As ULong) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'ULong'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As UInteger) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'UInteger'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As UShort) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'UShort'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Long) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Long'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Integer) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Integer'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Short) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Short'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Char) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Char'.
    'Public Shared Function GetBytes(value As Boolean) As Byte()': Value of type 'T' cannot be converted to 'Boolean'.


One solution I think would work is a large Select Case calling GetType(), but that is horrendously slow (because of boxing) and looks ugly. I would think that since I call my higher level class with a primitive data type for T, that the compiler would be smart enough to figure it out, but I assume I am not providing enough information for it to derive what T's underlying value is at compile time for the invoked instances.

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1  
Use TypeOf, not object.GetType(). This will not require boxing. Also, you could implement method overloads instead of a switch statement, and wouldn't even have to do the type check - it would be done at compile time. You're honestly going to save very few lines of code with a generic method that is implemented with a switch, and are only going to introduce performance overhead, ambiguity, and bugs. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 24 '11 at 23:13
    
@Merlyn: You mean method extensions to Int16, UInt32, etc? Can you provide a brief example so I can test performance? –  Kumba Jul 24 '11 at 23:16
    
I mean overloads. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms973896.aspx - though extension methods would be a more convenient syntax, they would boil down to an identical code path in the end (they're just syntactic sugar for static methods, taking the type as the first parameter). You can do them if you want. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 24 '11 at 23:18
    
Oh, yeah, I am already quite familiar with overloads. I was thinking some kind of trick as I sought for on this question a while back to convert from a String to a generic type. It's really fast and it avoids both reflection and calling Convert.ChangeType. Unfortunately, the primitives do not expose a Parse-like function that accepts their own type as a parameter, otherwise I'd be able to extend my existing implementation to handle this particular case. –  Kumba Jul 24 '11 at 23:23
    
@Merlyn: It also looks like TypeOf only works on reference types, per this answer here. So that puts me back to GetType calls since I am working on structure/primitive types. –  Kumba Jul 24 '11 at 23:32

2 Answers 2

I had a similar problem and solved it by converting the generic T type into an object first and then call the BitConverter.GetMethod(), i.e.

    Dim obj As Object = CType(Value, T)
    Dim bytes As Byte() = BitConverter.GetBytes(obj)
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Solved it myself.

Using a stripped-down version of the solution provided in my question, "Faster way to convert from a String to generic type T when T is a valuetype?", I was able to to create an extension method to a generic type called GenericGetBytes that would use the same delegate tricks to access the appropriate GetBytes method in the System.BitConverter class. This would preserve a decent amount of performance without me having to write up a bunch of overloaded functions for each type.

Code:

<System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension()>
Friend Function GenericGetBytes(Of T As Structure)(ByVal value As T) As Byte()
    Return GenericBitConverter(Of T).GetBytes(value)
End Function

Private Class GenericBitConverter(Of T As Structure)
    Private Sub New()
    End Sub

    Friend Delegate Function GetBytesFunc(ByVal value As T) As Byte()
    Friend Shared ReadOnly GetBytes As GetBytesFunc = FetchGetBytesFunc()

    Private Shared Function FetchGetBytesFunc() As GetBytesFunc
        Return DirectCast(GetBytesFunc.CreateDelegate(GetType(GetBytesFunc),
                                GetType(BitConverter).GetMethod("GetBytes", New Type() {GetType(T)})), 
                          GetBytesFunc)
    End Function
End Class


Invocation:

Public Sub Foobar(Of T As Structure)(ByVal value As T)
    Debug.Print(BitConverter.ToString(value.GenericGetBytes))
End Sub

Call Foobar(Of Int16)(42)


Output:

2A-00



Edit: And then I discover that the CType operator cannot convert from a base class to a derived class, which means the entire goal of this question and answer just became moot, as I have to move all my CType operators back to the derived classes. Hah.

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