Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am having trouble understanding this code. All I really need is to modify the head pointer to point to the first element. So why won't *head work ? Changing the value of *head changes where this pointer points to and that should work, right ? I have read the pass by reference/pass by value, but am finding it hard to understand. Can someone help clarify this ? Appreciate your help. Thanks.

In C/C++ it’s easier to make mistakes with pointer misuse. Consider this C/C++ code for inserting an element at the front of a list:

bool insertInFront( IntElement *head, int data ){
  IntElement *newElem = new IntElement;
  if( !newElem ) return false;

  newElem->data = data;
  head = newElem; // Incorrect!
  return true;
}

The preceding code is incorrect because it only updates the local copy of the head pointer. The correct version passes in a pointer to the head pointer:

bool insertInFront( IntElement **head, int data ){
  IntElement *newElem = new IntElement;
  if( !newElem ) return false;

  newElen->data = data;
  *head = newElem; // Correctly updates head
  return true;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the question? –  Kerrek SB Jul 24 '11 at 23:11
    
I didn't learn programming but how is it a linked list if IntElement doesn't seem to have a field dedicated for linking elements? =\ –  Dor Jul 24 '11 at 23:12
    
Ya the code is missing newElem->next = *head; –  jman Jul 24 '11 at 23:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need help understanding the difference right?

Imagine the caller of the function in the first case:

IntElement *head;
int data;
...
insertInFront (head, data);

Now, in this case, the address pointed to by head is placed on the stack and passed in as an argument to insertInFront. When insertInFront does head = newElement; only the argument (on the stack) is modified.

In the second case, the caller would be:

IntElement *head;
int data;
...
insertInFront (&head, data);

In this case, the address of head is placed on the stack and passed in as an argument to insertInFront. When you do *head = newElement, this passed in address is de-referenced to get the address of the original list head, and that is modified.

share|improve this answer

Its fairly simple when you get your head around what a pointer is. In the first code IntElement *head, head is a pointer to the existing head of the linked list. So the caller is passing in the address of the head element of the list. Changing the value of head in the insert-in-front function doesn't change ANYTHING back at the caller. The value of that address was passed to your function - not what was holding that address back at the caller.

You need to pass your function 'the address of the address of the head' - or IntElement **head. This will allow this function to modify the address held by the caller - i.e. update the linked list to point to the new head.

share|improve this answer

You don't want to change the value head points to, you want to change the pointer that is stored in head itself, so don't use *head, use a pointer to head itself. Head is of type IntElement *, so the parameter should be a pointer to such a type: IntElement **

share|improve this answer

Whenever you have a value T x somewhere and you want some other function to modify it, you pass a pointer to x:

T x;             // set to some value

modify_me(&x);   // will change x

/* ... */

void modify_me(T * x)
{
  *x = new_value;
}

Now just apply this mechanic to T = IntElement*. The values that you want to modify are themselves pointers!

(Maybe using a typedef would make things look less confusing: typedef IntElement * NodePtr;.)

Also note that your linked list is broken because you never set the "next" pointer of the new element to point to the old head, and similarly for the "previous" pointer if the list is doubly-linked.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.