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This is where I start by saying I am not a developer and this is not my code. As the DBA though it has shown up on plate from a performance perspective. The execution plan shows me that there are CI scans for Table2 aliased as D and Table2 aliased as E. Focusing on Table 2 aliased as E. The scan is coming from the subquery in the where clause for E.SEQ_NBR = I am also seeing far more executions than need be. I know it depends on the exact index structure on the table, but at a high level is it likely that what I am seeing is a CI scan resulting from the aggregate (min) for every match it finds. Basically it is walking the table for the min SEQ_NBR for each match on EMPLID and other fields?

If likely, is it more a result of the manner in which it is written (I would think incorporating a CTE with some ROW_NUMBER logic would help) or lack of indexing? I am trying to avoid throwing an index at it "just because". I am getting hung up on that sub query in the where clause.

SELECT
    D.EMPLID
   ,D.JOBCODE
   ,D.DEPTID
   ,E.DUR
   ,SUM(D.TL_QUANTITY) 'YTD_TL_QUANTITY'
FROM
    Table1 B
   ,Table2 D
   ,Table2 E
WHERE
    D.TRC = B.TRC
    AND B.TL_ERNCD IN ( @0, @1, @2, @3, @4, @5, @6 )
    AND D.EMPLID = E.EMPLID
    AND D.EMPL_RCD = E.EMPL_RCD
    AND D.DUR < = E.DUR
    AND D.DUR > = '1/1/' + CAST(DATEPART(YEAR, E.DUR) AS CHAR)
    AND E.SEQ_NBR = 
                ( SELECT
                    MIN(EX.SEQ_NBR)
                  FROM
                    Table2 EX
                  WHERE
                    E.EMPLID = EX.EMPLID
                    AND E.EMPL_RCD = EX.EMPL_RCD
                    AND E.DUR = EX.DUR
                )
    AND B.EFFDT = ( SELECT
                        MAX(B_ED.EFFDT)
                    FROM
                        Table1 B_ED
                    WHERE
                        B.TRC = B_ED.TRC
                        AND B_ED.EFFDT < = GETDATE()
                  )
GROUP BY
    D.EMPLID
   ,D.JOBCODE
   ,D.DEPTID
   ,E.DUR
share|improve this question
    
Basically, if there is nothing 'wrong' with the where clause, I will move on to other perf improvement steps –  mnDBA Jul 25 '11 at 5:44
    
Your query might be easier to analyse (and thus attract more attention) if you rewrote it using the explicit join syntax. –  Andriy M Jul 25 '11 at 14:10
    
Andriy M - I totally agree, and have done so for my internal troubleshooting. Sadly this is how the dev team for this specific app writes their code and I have not been able to talk them out of it. Figured I would post it in its native format in case that somehow played into the issue. –  mnDBA Jul 25 '11 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

The MIN operation has nothing to do with the CL scan. A MIN or Max is calculated using a sort. The problem is most likely the number of times the subquery is being executed. It has to loop through the subquery for every record returned in the parent query. A CTE may be helpful here depending on the size of Table2, but I don't think you need to worry about finding a replacement for the MIN() ... at least not yet.

share|improve this answer

Correlated subqueries are performance killers. Remove them and replace them with CTEs and JOINs or derived tables.

Try something like this (not tested)

SELECT
     D.EMPLID
     ,D.JOBCODE    
     ,D.DEPTID    
     ,E.DUR    
     ,SUM(D.TL_QUANTITY) 'YTD_TL_QUANTITY' 
FROM Table1 B    
JOIN Table2 D 
    ON D.TRC = B.TRC  AND D.EMPLID = E.EMPLID
JOIN Table2 E 
    ON D.EMPL_RCD = E.EMPL_RCD AND D.DUR < = E.DUR 
JOIN (SELECT MIN(EX.SEQ_NBR)FROM  Table2) EX 
    ON E.EMPLID = EX.EMPLID  
    AND E.EMPL_RCD = EX.EMPL_RCD                     
    AND E.DUR = EX.DUR  
JOIN (SELECT  MAX(B_ED.EFFDT)  
        FROM  Table1
        WHERE B_ED.EFFDT < = GETDATE()) B_ED 
    ON B.TRC = B_ED.TRC         
WHERE     B.TL_ERNCD IN ( @0, @1, @2, @3, @4, @5, @6 )           
AND D.DUR > = '1/1/' + CAST(DATEPART(YEAR, E.DUR) AS CHAR)  

As far as the implicit join syntax, do not allow anyone to ever do this again. It is a poor programming technique. As a DBA you can say what you will and will not allow in the database. Code review what is coming in and do not pass it until they remove the implicit syntax.

Why is is bad? In the first place you get accidental cross joins. Further, from a maintenance perspective, you can't tell if the cross join was accidental (and thus the query incorrect) or on purpose. This means the query with a cross join in it is unmaintainable.

Next, if you have to change some of the joins later to outer joins and do not fix all the implict ones at the same time, you can get incorrect results (which may not be noticed by an inexperienced developer. In SQL Server 2008 you cannot use the implicit syntax for an outer join, but it shouldn't have been used even as far back as SQl Server 2000 because Books Online (for SQL Server 2000) states that there are cases where it is misinterpreted. In other words, the syntax in unreliable for outer joins. There is no excuse ever for using an implicit join, you gain nothing from them over using an explicit join and they can create more problems.

You need to educate your developers and tell them that this code (which has been obsolete since 1992!) is not longer acceptable.

share|improve this answer
    
HLGEM - I agree whole heartedly, but it is out of my control and I am a very controlling DBA. :) These are developers for an ERP app and the implicit join syntax is how the app itself does it's SQL. I fight this battle constantly but it is not going to change anytime soon. It is not directly under my control. Thank you though, you have given me additional ammo about why the implicit join syntax is bad. –  mnDBA Jul 25 '11 at 15:54

This a quick one, but this, CAST('1/1/' + CAST(DATEPART(YEAR, E.DUR) AS CHAR) AS DATETIME), it likely causing a table scan on Table2 E because the function likely has to be evaluated against each row.

share|improve this answer
1  
In the context of this query, the expression on E.DUR is not the biggest issue. It's causing 1 table scan (at most) and the subqueries in the where clause are cuaing many table scans (could be 100s or 1000s of scans or more) due to executing once per record in parent query. –  Robert L Davis Jul 25 '11 at 14:15
    
I have updated the code to remove the CAST AS DATETIME. It is actually not in the original query. Was tinkering with various options to eliminate an implicit conversion as a contributing factor and determined it was not. Although not ideal, the overall issue does not appear to lie here. –  mnDBA Jul 25 '11 at 15:11

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