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How can I define an array of string in c then iterate with a loop through the items in the array?

So far I have

char myStrings[][10] = { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };
// do I need to specify the "10" maximum length?
// also does it automatically create a null ending character after the string?

int i = 0;
for( i = 0; i < ; i++)
{
// I need to pass each string to  a function which accepts
// const char *
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

When you declare a char sequence with "", null terminator is added.

char myStrings[][10] = { "one", "two", "three", "four", "five" };

size_t i = 0;
for( i = 0; i < sizeof(myStrings) / sizeof(myStrings[0]); i++)
{
    fooThatReceivesOneString(myStrings[i]);
}
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void loopftn (void)
{
  char *numbers[] = {"One", "Two", "Three", ""}, **n;

  n = numbers;
  while (*n != "") {
    printf ("%s\n",  *n++);
  }
  return;
}
  1. You don't need to have a maximum length.
  2. All strings in C are null-terminated.
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ad 1) You need to specify a length

ad 2) Yes, string literals are null-ended.

Inside your for, just call the function with parameter myStrings[i].

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do I need to specify the "10" maximum length?

Yes, apart from the 1st dimension of the array you need to mention all the subsequent dimensions

lso does it automatically create a null ending character after the string?

Yes

I need to pass each string to a function which accepts const char *

You can pass each string like this:

for( i = 0; i < ; i++)
{
  foo(myStrings[i]);
}

Also, You can choose between const char* and char*; since you have declare this as an array it's modifyable; had it been something like

const char *mystrings[] = { " ", " "}; // string literal

then you must have to pass it as const char* because string literals should always be const char*

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2  
C'mon, almost the best answer, but you didn't provide an answer to the main question: how to access the particular string :) –  unkulunkulu Jul 25 '11 at 8:02
    
@unkulunkulu, thanks edited. –  iammilind Jul 25 '11 at 8:51

Yes, you need to specify the length, or add a NULL entry as the last entry in your string array. C does not do that automatically for you.

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Try this..

int j =0;
while (char myStrings[][j] !='\0'){
  i++;
}
for (i = 0; i < j; i++)    {
  somemethod(myStrings[][i]);
}
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I always do it that way, seems elegant and easy to me.
You just define an array as usual, without fixed index.
All you have to make sure is to add a single 0 at the end.
Then you can make the shortest TEST case possible and iterate through it with for or while.

Here is an example, it displays a list of options and the fitting help element (in that case the help array needs to be at least as long as the options one.

const char *options[]={
    "CAL_MAG_MIN",
    "CAL_MAG_MAX",
    0
    };
const char *help[]={
    "<X,Y,Z>",
    "<X,Y,Z>",
    0
    };

int pos;
for (pos=0;options[pos];pos++)
{
    printf("\t %s %s\n",options[pos],help[pos]);
}
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