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This article describes a great pattern called 'Domain Events': http://www.udidahan.com/2009/06/14/domain-events-salvation/

One major flaw with this pattern however is highlighted in comment 27 by user Andy: If a transaction fails, we don't want our domain events to execute. Therefore, we need to create some sort of queuing mechanism.

Unfortunately this sounds like it is going to massively complicate a technique that was supposed to simplify the system.

Does anyone know of some good examples or discussions of queuing domain events, particular a solution that integrates well with NHibernate?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

I worked out how to do this: The secret is the RegisterSynchronization method of NHibernate's ITransaction.

As an example, here is how I might send an email to a customer only when the transaction is committed:

public class NotifyCustomerEmail
{
    private void MailMessage { get; set; }

    public void SendAsyncOnceTransactionCommits()
    {
        if (MailMessage == null)
            ComposeMailMessage();

        NHibernateSessionManager
            .CurrentSession
            .Transaction
            .RegisterSynchronization(new SendEmailSynchronization(this.MailMessage));
    }
}
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Was thinking on the same line, however your approach is cleaner –  Umair Ahmed Nov 7 '13 at 5:48
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