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I have learnt that when we pass the array name to sizeof, the name of the array does not decay to the pointer to base address. The code below verifies this fact by giving answer 10.

#include <stdio.h> 

int main(){  
    int arr[10];  
    printf("Size of array is %d" , sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int));  
    return 0;  
}

However when I run the code below, the answer comes 1. Irrespective of whether a dimension is written in prototype or not , the answer is 1. Why is it so ?

#include <stdio.h>

void dimension(int arr[]){  
    printf("Sizof array is %d" , sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int));  
}


int main(){  
    int arr[10];  
    dimension(arr);  
    return 0;  
}  
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The standard says the array name in a function's arguments will be considered as a pointer. So int arr[] will be int *arr, and int arr[][10] will be int (*p)[10] (remaining size of a pointer). Aside: sizeof(arr)/sizeof(arr[0]) is better, when you change the type of arr, you won't have to modified this place. –  Stan Jul 25 '11 at 8:46
1  
@Stan: Should have been an answer, I think. –  phresnel Jul 25 '11 at 9:02
    
It produces 1 because you are working in a 32-bit environment where sizeof(void *) == sizeof(int); in 64-bit environments, it would produce 2 normally because a pointer is 8 bytes but int remains 4 bytes. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '11 at 22:29
    
possible duplicate of Sizeof an array in the C programming language? –  Bo Persson Aug 6 '12 at 21:24
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8 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This signature

void dimension(int arr[])

is absolutely equivalent to

void dimension(int *arr)

See also Question 6.4

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Because you pass an array of unknown size which is equivalent to a pointer in this context. sizeof is calculated at compile time, not runtime.

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Except for the Variable-Length Array (VLA) in C99, sizeof works like what you said. –  Stan Jul 25 '11 at 8:49
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When array is passed to a function, it is passed as a pointer, not an array, so the sizeof(arr) will return sizeof(int *)

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1  
it is not the size of an int on x64 –  unkulunkulu Jul 25 '11 at 8:40
    
@unkulunkulu - it depends, and that's why I said usually. –  MByD Jul 25 '11 at 8:46
    
I didn't notice the word "usually" :) –  unkulunkulu Jul 25 '11 at 8:50
    
anyway, you can't say "usually" if it's not correct for x64 :D –  unkulunkulu Jul 25 '11 at 8:51
    
so maybe it's my lack of knowledge in english... –  MByD Jul 25 '11 at 8:52
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Arrays as function arguments do decay to pointer, though. Since this happens before sizeof() is called, you can't prevent it.

Just think about it: how can sizeof() know the size of an array if any size array can be passed and no extra info is available? You get sizeof(pointer), and that seems to be the same size as an int, in your setup.

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In

void dimension(int arr[]){  
    printf("Sizof array is %d" , sizeof(arr)/sizeof(int));  
}

arr[] decays to a pointer, therefore you have the equivalent of

printf("Sizof array is %d" , sizeof(int*)/sizeof(int));

and because on your platform, sizeof(int*) == sizeof(int), you receive 1 as the result.

Note however, that for variable length arrays, sizeof becomes a runtime operation:

int main () {
    int i = ...;
    int x[i];
    printf("number of elements: %d", sizeof (x) / size(*x));
}
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because arr is a pointer, which is an integer .

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It returns the size of the pointer, which is integer.

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I think "I think" answers can never be good answers, tho. –  phresnel Jul 25 '11 at 9:01
    
You're right. Thanks for constructive criticism. –  Alex Ackerman Jul 25 '11 at 9:25
    
You would have to explain a bit more, like "which pointer" ;) –  phresnel Jul 25 '11 at 9:30
    
The thing is - I don't work with c/c++ right now, but I do remember those things from my studies - thus "I think". :) –  Alex Ackerman Jul 25 '11 at 9:35
    
I see ;) (6 more to go) –  phresnel Jul 25 '11 at 9:44
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Because you're passing an unknown size array.

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You need to provide a bit more explanation than "Because you're passing an unknown size array" to gain reputation. The core of the answer is basically correct, but not sufficiently helpful to score. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 25 '11 at 22:31
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