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The following section of code is working as expected...

create table todel (id int not null auto_increment, name varchar(100), primary key (id));
insert into todel values (NULL, '24');
select @myid:=last_insert_id();
insert into todel values (NULL, @myid);

mysql> select * from todel;
+----+------+
| id | name |
+----+------+
|  1 | 24   |
|  2 | 1    |
+----+------+

But the same code does not work when I try to wrap it in perl code.

vi myperl.pl

#!D:\Perl\bin\perl

open (output_file, ">myperl.txt");
@Program_ID = '24';
print output_file
"create table todel (id int not null auto_increment, name varchar(100), primary key (id));
insert into todel values (NULL, '@Program_ID');
select @myid:=last_insert_id();
insert into todel values (NULL, '@myid');";

close(output_file);

It generates the code as shown below. The mysql variable name @myid is missing.

# cat myperl.txt
create table todel (id int not null auto_increment, name varchar(100), primary key (id));
insert into todel values (NULL, '24');
select :=last_insert_id();
insert into todel values (NULL, '');

How do I let perl know that I do not want to replace the mysql variable? I want to replace the @Program_ID variable though.

share|improve this question
    
Writing perl scripts without use strict; use warnings; is always a bad idea. You will get errors, but you will know what they are, and so you can fix them. –  TLP Jul 25 '11 at 18:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try

insert into todel values (NULL, '\@Program_ID');
select \@myid:=last_insert_id();
insert into todel values (NULL, '\@myid');";
share|improve this answer

You need to escape the @ in @myid or Perl will treat it as the array named myid.

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Above your print statement, put my @myid = 'a'; and comment out the glob output_file like so:

print # output_file
    "create...

Put exit 0; after the print statement, like so:

...
insert into todel values (NULL, '@myid');";
exit 0;

You should see this:

create table todel (id int not null auto_increment, name varchar(100), primary key (id));
insert into todel values (NULL, '24');
select a:=last_insert_id();
insert into todel values (NULL, a);

Thus, you should see the contents of the array @myid substituted for the string @myid.

Now comment out the declaration of @myid, and insert this at the top of the script:

use strict;
use warnings;

and run it. Under 5.12 you should see:

Possible unintended interpolation of @myid in string at - line nn.
Possible unintended interpolation of @myid in string at - line nn.
Global symbol "@myid" requires explicit package name at - line nn.
Global symbol "@myid" requires explicit package name at - line nn.
Execution of - aborted due to compilation errors.

Do you think that if you had used strict, these errors would have told you enough? Even if you didn't understand "interpolation" googling "perl interpolation" would have helped a lot.

Now, uncomment the declaration my @myid = 'a';, when you run it, you'll see the same output as before, but no error messages.

What this means is that when Perl sees $ or @ in a double-quote situation (really, lookup "perl interpolation" or perldoc perlop ) it substitutes the variable of the same name in that string. It borrows from UNIX world the idea of interpolating quotes (") and non-interpolating quotes (') and in an interpolating quote situation, you have to escape the sigil ('$' or '@') and then Perl will treat it like the literal character.

Another thing you could do to correct the whole mess is use a non-interpolating quote operator. Since you use a single quote in your SQL, we can't just use single-quote to avoid interpolation. Instead we can use the q operator. Place q{ at the top of the SQL and } at the bottom, like so:

print output_file
    q{create ...
    ...
    insert into todel values (NULL, @myid);
    };

Really, click on the perldoc link.

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Like the others said, the @ is confusing the interpreter. That's why it's (IMO) a good habit to single-quote a string if it doesn't include any variable interpolations.

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