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I've come across a strange problem with method specialisation.

Given this code...

#include <string>

class X
{
public:

    template< typename T >
    void set( T v );
};

template<>
void X::set( const std::string & v )
{
}

template<>
void X::set( int v )
{
}

int main( int, char *[] )
{
    X x;

    std::string y;

    x.set( y );

    x.set( 1 );
}

When I link it with g++ 4.3.3 I get an undefined reference to void X::set<std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > >(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >).

Which is basically an undefined reference to void X::set( std::string ).

So my question is, why doesn't the compiler use the specialisation with const std::string & ?

If I explicitly call x.set< const std::string & >( y ) then this compiles and links fine.

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In such scenario, you can also think of overloading rather than specialization. stackoverflow.com/search?q=overload+vs+specialization –  iammilind Jul 25 '11 at 10:59
    
I realise (and it's been pointed out below) that I could have not used templates when creating the templated member function set(). However, I wanted to make sure that only the code that was used actaully gets compiled and I didn't want to have to provide a set() method if the code doesn't actually use it. i.e. –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 11:18
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Probably this article will explain the situation.
You might expect the specialization void X::set( const std::string& ) will participate in overload resolution. However, surprisingly, specializations don't participate in overload resolution.
In the call x.set( y ), the compiler deduces the type of T in the primary template from the argument y with a type std::string. So, the compiler deduces that T is std::string, then searches matching specialization.
However, since std::string and const std::string& are different types, the compiler selects primary template in the end.

After proper primary template is selected, the matching specialization is selected in the same manner as the case for class template. The reason that the specialization set( const std::string& ) isn't selected is similar to that the specialization A< std::string > isn't selected in the following code:

template< class > class A; // primary

template<> class A< const std::string& > {}; // specialization

int main() {
  A< std::string > a; // This doesn't select the specialization
}
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Reverting back to original proposition after compilation:

Your method signature for string should not be a reference. Should be:

template<>
void X::set( const std::string v )
{
}

This is because in your template definition you have specified T paramater and not T& paramater

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so I should supply an additional set declaration which has T & and then specialise the reference one? –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 10:51
    
That should do it. –  Adrian Regan Jul 25 '11 at 10:53
    
Or you could typedef string& and use that. –  Adrian Regan Jul 25 '11 at 10:54
    
I tried adding a "template< typename T > void X::set( T & v );" but got compilation errors suggesting ambiguity. –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 10:54
    
The compiler can't choose between pass by reference and pass by value. They are equally good matches. –  Bo Persson Jul 25 '11 at 11:00
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It's altogether incorrect syntax. When specializing templates, you have to include the angle brackets with the types you are specializing for. E.g.:

template<typename T>
struct X { ... };

template<>
struct X<int> { ... };
//      ^^^^^ see, there have to be angle brackets after the identifier

So

template<>
void X::set(std::string &) { ... }

is not specializing anything, it is implementing

class X {
    template<>
    void set(std::string &) { ... }
};

which is altogether different function. What I don't understand is why gcc didn't produce an error because the class does not have that member.

Now even if you used the supposedly-correct syntax, it wouldn't be correct, because, as already answered by Tom, you can't specialize functions (just overload with non-template version). In C++03, that is; it is allowed in C++0x.

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Hmm.. yes, I also agree that the specialisation code was incorrect and am also surprised that gcc didn't complain about it. I'm a little perplexed by your statement though that you can't specialise functions as I plainly can by prodiding a specialisation based on "std::string" rather than "const std::string &" and it compiles and links correctly. –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 11:28
    
The compiler will do it as long as you don't tell it to be super-strict about the standard. But, it's still not technically "correct", so you may want to avoid such things for the sake of portability across compilers. –  DSimon Jul 25 '11 at 11:47
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What you want to use is overloading.

class X
{
public:
    void set( int v); //the case for ints
    void set( const std::string&) //the case for strings

    //The default catch all case.
    template< typename T >
    void set( T v );
};

//not a template specialisation.
void X::set( int v )
{
}
//not a template specialisation.
void X::set( const std::string & v )
{
}
//the catch all case 
template<typename T>
void X::set(T v)
{
}

The non-template operators will be chosen ahead of the template because they provide a better match if available. Otherwise the template will be chosen

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Yes, agreed but it doesn't really answer my question as to why the compiler didn't consider the const std::string & specialisation to be a good enough match.. or maybe I missed something –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 11:09
    
... or any other function for that matter. –  Jan Hudec Jul 25 '11 at 11:13
    
Hi Tom, but what if I wanted to provide declaration of a method but would like the user to supply it's implementation without having to derive from my class and use overloading. Surely I just declare the set as a template member function and then let the user write the specialisations dependent on what types the user requires. I'm really beginning to doubt my approach though if it's hitting edge cases in the language.. –  ScaryAardvark Jul 25 '11 at 11:36
    
ScaryAardvark, perhaps you can go into more detail about what you're trying to accomplish? We might be able to provide some alternate suggestions. –  DSimon Jul 25 '11 at 11:54
    
@ScaryAardvark: I believe in that case you want to create a class (struct, so you don't need the public keyword) template with the function as a method. User can specialize that. You can than wrap it in simple function template for type inference. –  Jan Hudec Jul 25 '11 at 12:09
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