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If I declare a global variable x as:

var x = "I am window.x";

x will be a public property of the window object. If I call a global function (without using "call", "apply" or attaching it to another object first), the window object will be passed in as the context (the “this” keyword). It is like it is siting the x property on the current context, which happens to be the window.

If, however, I declare a variable in the same way inside a function, then use that function as a constructor, the property x will not be a public property of the object I just constructed (the current context). I am happy (I know I can do this.x = …), but it just seems like a bit of a contradiction.

Have I misunderstood something (about it being a contradiction / different behaviour)? Would anyone be able to explain what is going on, or is it just something I have to accept?

Hope that my question is clear.

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"this" is not context. If you use an unqualified reference to call a function, its this keyword will be set to the global object, it is not "passed in". ECMA-262 defines an execution context as the scope, variables, parameters, this, and everything else that is setup when a function execution context is entered. It is a lot more than just "this" (which can be set to anything by the call). –  RobG Jul 25 '11 at 13:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It seems like you've understood it just fine (I pick one small nit with your terminology below). Local variables within constructor functions are just that: Local variables inside constructor functions. They're not part of the instance being initialized by the constructor function at all.

This is all a consequence of how "scope" works in JavaScript. When you call a function, an execution context (EC) is created for that call to the function. The EC has something called the variable context which has a binding object (let's just call it the "variable object," eh?). The variable object holds all of the vars and function arguments and other stuff defined within the function. This variable object is a very real thing and very important to how closures work, but you can't directly access it. Your x in the constructor function is a property of the variable object created for the call to the constructor function.

All scopes have a variable object; the magic is that the variable object for the global scope is the global object, which is window on browsers. (More accurately, window is a property on the variable object that refers back to the variable object, so you can reference it directly. The variable objects in function calls don't have any equivalent property.) So the x you define at global scope is a property of window.

That terminology nit-picking I promised: You've said:

If call a global function, the window object will be passed in as the context (the “this” keyword).

Which is mostly true. E.g., if you call a global function like this:

myGlobalFunction();

...then yes, this will be the global object (window) during the call. But there are lots of other ways you might call that global function where it won't be. For instance, if you assign that "global" function to a property on an object and then call the function via that property, this within the call will be the object the property belongs to:

var obj = {};
obj.foo = myGlobalFunction;
obj.foo();    // `this` is `obj` within the call, not `window`
obj['foo'](); // Exactly the same as above, just different notation

or you might use call or apply features of function objects to set this explicitly:

var obj = {};
myGlobalFunction.call(obj, 1, 2, 3);    // Again, `this` will be `obj`
myGlobalFunction.apply(obj, [1, 2, 3]); // Same (`call` and `apply` just vary
                                        // in terms of how you pass arguments

More to explore (disclosure: these are links to my blog, but it doesn't have ads or anything, seems unlikely I'll add them):


Update: Below you've said:

I just want to check my understanding: In any scope (global or function) there are always 2 objects: a “this” object (what is that called?) and a “variable object”. In the global scope, these 2 objects are the same. In a function’s scope, they are different, and the “variable object” is not accessible. Is that correct?

You're on the right track, and yes, there are always those two things kicking around (usually more; see below). But "scope" and this have nothing to do with each other. This is surprising if you're coming to JavaScript from other languages, but it's true. this in JavaScript (which is sometimes called "context" although that can be misleading) is defined entirely by how a function is called, not where the function is defined. You set this when calling a function in any of several ways (see answer and links above). From a this perspective, there is no difference whatsoever between a function defined a global scope and one defined within another function. Zero. Zilch.

But yes, in JavaScript code (wherever it's defined) there's always this, which may be anything, and a variable object. In fact, there are frequently multiple variable objects, arranged in a chain. This is called the scope chain. When you try to retrieve the value of a free variable (an unqualified symbol, e.g. x rather than obj.x), the interpreter looks in the topmost variable object for a property with that name. If it doesn't find one, it goes to the next link in the chain (the next outer scope) and looks on that variable object. If it doesn't have one, it looks at the next link in the chain, and so on, and so on. And you know what the final link in the chain is, right? Right! The global object (window, on browsers).

Consider this code (assume we start in global scope; live copy):

var alpha = "I'm window.alpha";
var beta  = "I'm window.beta";

// These, of course, reference the globals above
display("[global] alpha = " + alpha);
display("[global] beta  = " + beta);

function foo(gamma) {
    var alpha = "I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `foo`";

    newSection();
    // References `alpha` on the variable object for this call to `foo`
    display("[foo] alpha = " + alpha);
    // References `beta` on `window` (the containing variable object)
    display("[foo] beta  = " + beta);
    // References `gamma` on the variable object for this call to `foo`
    display("[foo] gamma = " + gamma);

    setTimeout(callback, 200);

    function callback() {
        var alpha = "I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `callback`";

        newSection();
        // References `alpha` on the variable obj for this call to `callback`
        display("[callback] alpha = " + alpha);
        // References `beta` on `window` (the outermost variable object)
        display("[callback] beta  = " + beta);
        // References `gamma` on the containing variable object (the call to `foo` that created `callback`) 
        display("[callback] gamma = " + gamma);
    }
}

foo("I'm gamma1, passed as an argument to foo");
foo("I'm gamma2, passed as an argument to foo");

function display(msg) {
    var p = document.createElement('p');
    p.innerHTML = msg;
    document.body.appendChild(p);
}
function newSection() {
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement('hr'));
}

The output is this:

[global] alpha = I'm window.alpha
[global] beta = I'm window.beta
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[foo] alpha = I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `foo`
[foo] beta = I'm window.beta
[foo] gamma = I'm gamma1, passed as an argument to foo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[foo] alpha = I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `foo`
[foo] beta = I'm window.beta
[foo] gamma = I'm gamma2, passed as an argument to foo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[callback] alpha = I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `callback`
[callback] beta = I'm window.beta
[callback] gamma = I'm gamma1, passed as an argument to foo
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
[callback] alpha = I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `callback`
[callback] beta = I'm window.beta
[callback] gamma = I'm gamma2, passed as an argument to foo

You can see the scope chain at work there. During a call to callback, the chain is (top to bottom):

  • The variable object for that call to callback
  • The variable object for the call to foo that created callback
  • The global object

Note how the variable object for the call to foo lives on past the end of the foo function (foo returns before callback gets called by setTimeout). That's how closures work. When a function is created (note that a new callback function object is created each time we call foo), it gets an enduring reference to the variable object at the top of the scope chain as of that moment (the whole thing, not just the bits we see it reference). So for a brief moment while we're waiting our two setTimeout calls to happen, we have two variable objects for calls to foo in memory. Note also that arguments to functions behave exactly like vars. Here's the runtime of the above broken down:

  1. The interpreter creates the global scope.
  2. It creates the global object and populates it with its default set of properties (window, Date, String, and all the other "global" symbols you're used to having).
  3. It creates properties on the global object for all var statements at global scope; initially they have the value undefined. So in our case, alpha and beta.
  4. It creates properties on the global object for all function declarations at global scope; initially they have the value undefined. So in our case, foo and my utility functions display and newSection.
  5. It processes each function declaration at global scope (in order, top to bottom):
    • Creates the function object
    • Assigns it a reference to the current variable object (the global object in this case)
    • Assigns the function object to its property on the variable object (again, the global object in this case)
  6. The interpreter begins executing the step-by-step code, at the top.
  7. The first line it reaches is var alpha = "I'm window.alpha";. It's already done the var aspect of this, of course, and so it processes this as a straight assignment.
  8. Same for var beta = ....
  9. It calls display twice (details omitted).
  10. The foo function declaration has already been processed and isn't part of step-by-step code execution at all, so the next line the interpreter reaches is is foo("I'm gamma1, passed as an argument to foo");.
  11. It creates an execution context for the call to foo.
  12. It creates a variable object for this execution context, which for convenience I'll call foo#varobj1.
  13. It assigns foo#varobj1 a copy of foo's reference to the variable object where foo was created (the global object in this case); this is its link to the "scope chain."
  14. The interpreter creates properties on foo#varobj1 for all named function arguments, vars, and function declarations inside foo. So in our case, that's gamma (the argument), alpha (the var), and callback (the declared function). Initially they have the value undefined. (A few other default properties are created here that I won't go into.)
  15. It assigns the properties for the function arguments the values passed to the function.
  16. It processes each function declaration in foo (in order, beginning to end). In our case, that's callback:
    • Creates the function object
    • Assigns that function object a reference to the current variable object (foo#varobj1)
    • Assigns the function object to its property on foo#varobj1
  17. The interpreter begins step-by-step execution of the foo code
  18. It processes the assignment from the var alpha = ... line, giving foo#varobj1.alpha its value.
  19. It looks up the free variable newSection and calls the function (details omitted, we'll go into detail in a moment).
  20. It looks up the free variable alpha:
    • First it looks on foo#varobj1. Since foo#varobj1 has a property with that name, it uses the value of that property.
  21. It looks up display and calls it (details omitted).
  22. It looks up the free variable beta:
    • First it looks on foo#varobj1, but foo#varobj1 doesn't have a property with that name
    • It looks up the next link in the scope chain by querying foo#varobj1 for its reference to the next link
    • It looks on that next link (which happens to be the global object in this case), finds a property by that name, and uses its value
  23. It calls display
  24. It looks up gamma and calls display. This is exactly the same as for alpha above.
  25. It looks up the free variable callback, finding it on foo#varobj1
  26. It looks up the free variable setTimeout, finding it on the global object
  27. It calls setTimeout, passing in the arguments (details omitted)
  28. It returns out of foo. At this point, if nothing had a reference to foo#varobj1, that object could be reclaimed. But since the browser's timer stuff has a reference to the callback function object, and the callback function object has a reference to foo#varobj1, foo#varobj1 lives on until/unless nothing refers to it anymore. This is the key to closures.
  29. Wash/rinse/repeat for the second call to foo, which creates foo#varobj2 and another copy of callback, assigning that second callback a reference to foo#varobj2, and ultimately passing that second callback to setTimeout and returning.
  30. The interpreter runs out of step-by-step code to execute and goes into its event loop, waiting for something to happen
  31. About 200 milliseconds go by
  32. The browser's timer stuff tells the interpreter it needs to call the first callback function we created in foo
  33. The interpreter creates an execution context and associated variable object (callback#varobj1) for the call; it assigns callback#varobj1 a copy of the variable object reference stored on the callback function object (which is, of course, foo#varobj1) so as to establish the scope chain.
  34. It creates a property, alpha, on callback#varobj1
  35. It starts step-by-step execution of callback's code
  36. You know what happens next. It looks up various symbols and calls various functions:
    • Looks up newSection, which it doesn't find on callback#varobj1 and so looks at the next link, foo#varobj1. Not finding it there, it looks at the next link, which is the global object, and finds it.
    • Looks up alpha, which it finds on the topmost variable object, callback#varobj1
    • Looks up beta, which it doesn't find until it gets down to the global object
    • Looks up gamma, which it finds only one link down the scope chain on foo#varobj1
  37. The interpreter returns from the call to callback
  38. Almost certainly, there in its event queue there's a message from the browser waiting for it, telling it to call the second callback function, which we created in our second call to foo.
  39. So it does it all again. This time, the variable object for the call to callback gets a reference to foo#varobj2 because that's what's stored on this particular callback function object. So (amongst other things) it sees the gamma argument we passed to the second call, rather than the first one.
  40. Since the browser has now released its references to the two callback function objects, they and the objects they refer to (including foo#varobj1, foo#varobj2, and anything their properties point to, like gamma's strings) are all eligible for garbage collection.

Whew That was fun, eh?

One final point about the above: Note how JavaScript scope is determined entirely by the nesting of the functions in the source code; this is called "lexical scoping." E.g., the call stack doesn't matter for variable resolution (except in terms of when functions get created, because they get a reference to the variable object in scope when they were created), just the nesting in the source code. Consider (live copy):

var alpha = "I'm window.alpha";

function foo() {
    var alpha = "I'm alpha in the variable object for the call to `foo`";

    bar();
}

function bar() {

    display("alpha = " + alpha);
}

foo();

What ends up getting output for alpha? Right! "I'm window.alpha". The alpha we define in foo has no effect whatsoever on bar, even though we called bar from foo. Let's quickly walk through:

  1. Set up global execution context etc. etc.
  2. Create properties for the vars and declared functions.
  3. Assign alpha its value.
  4. Create the foo function object, give it a reference to the current variable object (which is the global object), put it on the foo property.
  5. Create the bar function object, give it a reference to the current variable object (which is the global object), put it on the bar property.
  6. Call foo by creating an execution context and variable object. The variable object, foo#varobj1, gets a copy of foo's reference to its parent variable object, which is of course the global object.
  7. Start step-by-step execution of foo's code.
  8. Look up the free variable bar, which it finds on the global object.
  9. Create an execution context for the call to bar and its associated variable object bar#varobj1. Assign bar#varobj1 a copy of bar's reference to its parent variable object, which is of course the global object.
  10. Start step-by-step execution of bar's code.
  11. Look up the free variable alpha:
    • First it looks on bar#varobj1, but there's no property with that name there
    • So it looks at the next link, which is the link it got from bar, which is the global object. So it finds the global alpha

Note how foo#varobj1 isn't linked at all to bar's variable object. And that's good, because we'd all go nuts if what was in scope was defined by how and from where a function was called. :-) Once you understand that it's linked to function creation, which is dictated by the nesting of the source code, it gets a lot easier to understand.

And that's why what's in scope for bar is determined entirely by where bar is in the source code, not how it got called at runtime.

It's not surprising that initially you were wondering about the relationship between this and variable resolution, because the global object (window) serves two unrelated purposes in JavaScript: 1. It's the default this value if a function isn't called in a way that sets a different one (and at global scope), and 2. It's the global variable object. These are unrelated aspects of what the interpreter uses with the global object for, which can be confusing, because when this === window, it seems like variable resolution relates in some way to this, but it doesn't. As soon as you start using something else for this, this and variable resolution are completely disconnected from one another.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the bit on execution/variable object. –  RobG Jul 25 '11 at 13:20
    
I just want to check my understanding: In any scope (global or function) there are always 2 objects: a “this” object (what is that called?) and a “variable object”. In the global scope, these 2 objects are the same. In a function’s scope, they are different, and the “variable object” is not accessible. Is that correct? –  zod Jul 25 '11 at 14:00
    
@zod: I've updated the answer to address that comment. Hope this helps, –  T.J. Crowder Jul 25 '11 at 14:53
    
@zod: And crazy man that I am, I just added some detailed code walkthroughs to really lay it out. Must blog this. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 25 '11 at 15:57
    
Thanks @T.J. Crowder –  zod Jul 25 '11 at 15:58

Your understanding of properties and constructors is fine; the concepts you're missing are 'scopes' and 'closures'. This is where var comes into play.

Try reading Robert Nyman's explanation

share|improve this answer

You have some examples in this fiddle :

var x = 42;

function alertXs() {
    this.x = 'not 42'; // this = window
    var x = '42 not'; // local x

    alert('window.x = ' + window.x); // 'not 42'
    alert('this.x = ' + this.x);     // 'not 42'
    alert('x = ' + x);               // '42 not'

}

alertXs();

http://jsfiddle.net/Christophe/Pgk73/

Sometimes, creating tiny fiddles helps to understand...

But you are aware with local and public variable as you explain that very well...

share|improve this answer
    
Live links are a great adjunct to an answer, but always post the relevant code in the answer as well. Two reasons. 1. People shouldn't have to follow a link to see what you're saying. 2. StackOverflow is meant to be a resource not just for this questioner now, but for others having a similar issue in the future. External links can get moved, modified, deleted, etc. By making sure the relevant code is in the answer, we ensure that the answer remains useful for a reasonable period of time. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 25 '11 at 12:16
    
Ok thanks for info, I posted the code here too ;) –  ChristopheCVB Jul 25 '11 at 12:20

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