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After connecting to the database, can I get the name of all the columns that were returned in my sqldatareader?

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7 Answers

up vote 89 down vote accepted
var reader = cmd.ExecuteReader();

var columns = new List<string>();

for(int i=0;i<reader.FieldCount;i++)
{
   columns.Add(reader.GetName(i));
}
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28  
it's insane that there is no enumerable interface that lets you iterate through the columns. –  JohnFx Jun 16 '11 at 4:35
1  
Better than nothing... this saved me. –  user80855 Oct 30 '12 at 15:29
18  
A bit shorter: columns = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount) .Select(reader.GetName).ToList(); –  Alex May 23 '13 at 14:05
1  
This works great. I also found out that my column names were all uppercase unless I used quotes around the column name. SELECT id AS "MyId" FROM table; –  styfle Jul 13 '13 at 0:02
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There is a GetName function on the SqlDataReader which accepts the column index and returns the name of the column.

Conversely, there is a GetOrdinal which takes in a column name and returns the column index.

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Why on earth isn't this marked as answer? –  prc322 Nov 26 '13 at 13:00
1  
Two reasons: first, the original poster has not chosen an answer yet, and secondly, there are other answers that give more detailed description of the problem's 'solution' then just the existence of the functionality. Personally, I like Steven Lyons' answer the best as not only does it talk about GetName but also goes into FieldType and DataType. –  Stephen Wrighton Nov 26 '13 at 14:56
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You can get the column names from a DataReader... here is an article that gives an overview.

Here is the important part:

  for (int col = 0; col < SqlReader.FieldCount; col++)
  {
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetName(col).ToString());         // Gets the column name
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetFieldType(col).ToString());    // Gets the column type
    Console.Write(SqlReader.GetDataTypeName(col).ToString()); // Gets the column database type
  }
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You sure can.


protected void GetColumNames_DataReader()
{
  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection SqlCon = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection("server=localhost;database=northwind;trusted_connection=true");
  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand SqlCmd = new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand("SELECT * FROM Products", SqlCon);

  SqlCon.Open();

  System.Data.SqlClient.SqlDataReader SqlReader = SqlCmd.ExecuteReader();
  System.Int32 _columncount = SqlReader.FieldCount;

  System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("SqlDataReader Columns");
  System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(" ");

  for ( System.Int32 iCol = 0; iCol < _columncount; iCol ++ )
  {
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write("Column " + iCol.ToString() + ": ");
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(SqlReader.GetName( iCol ).ToString());
    System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Response.Write(" ");
  }

}

This is originally from: http://www.dotnetjunkies.ddj.com/Article/B82A22D1-8437-4C7A-B6AA-C6C9BE9DB8A6.dcik

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If you want the column names only, you can do:

List<string> columns = new List<string>();
using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader(CommandBehavior.SchemaOnly))
{
    DataTable dt = reader.GetSchemaTable();
    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
    {
        columns.Add(row.Field<String>("ColumnName"));
    }
}

But if you only need one row, I like my AdoHelper addition. This addition is great if you have a single line query and you don't want to deal with data table in you code. It's returning a case insensitive dictionary of column names and values.

public static Dictionary<string, string> ExecuteCaseInsensitiveDictionary(string query, string connectionString, Dictionary<string, string> queryParams = null)
{
    Dictionary<string, string> CaseInsensitiveDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
    try
    {
        using (SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString))
        {
            conn.Open();
            using (SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand())
            {
                cmd.Connection = conn;
                cmd.CommandType = CommandType.Text;
                cmd.CommandText = query;

                // Add the parameters for the SelectCommand.
                if (queryParams != null)
                    foreach (var param in queryParams)
                        cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue(param.Key, param.Value);

                using (SqlDataReader reader = cmd.ExecuteReader())
                {
                    DataTable dt = new DataTable();
                    dt.Load(reader);
                    foreach (DataRow row in dt.Rows)
                    {
                        foreach (DataColumn column in dt.Columns)
                        {
                            CaseInsensitiveDictionary.Add(column.ColumnName, row[column].ToString());
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
            conn.Close();
        }
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        throw ex;
    }
    return CaseInsensitiveDictionary;
}
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Already mentioned. Just a LINQ answer:

var columns = reader.GetSchemaTable().Rows
                                     .Cast<DataRow>()
                                     .Select(r => (string)r["ColumnName"])
                                     .ToList();

//Or

var columns = Enumerable.Range(0, reader.FieldCount)
                        .Select(reader.GetName)
                        .ToList();

The second one is cleaner and much faster. Even if you cache GetSchemaTable in the first approach, the querying is going to be very slow.

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I use the GetSchemaTable method, which is exposed via the IDataReader interface.

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