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I have two classes like the following:

class Super(object):
    def __init__(self, arg):
        self.arg = arg

    def load(self):
        # Load data from disk if available
        try:
            self.data = load_routine()
        except IOError as e:
            if e[0] == errno.ENOENT:
                pass
            else:
                raise


class Sub(Super):
    def __init__(self, arg2, *args, **kwargs):
        super(Sub, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.arg2 = arg2

    def load(self):
        # Load files specific to superclass
        super(Sub, self).load()
        # Load data from disk if available
        try:
            self.data2 = another_different_load_routine(self.arg2)
        except IOError as e:
            if e[0] == errno.ENOENT:
                pass
            else:
                raise

I hope the code is clear enough, and unless I missed something this should work for both classes by using it for example like: obj = Super(); obj.load().

However, I actually want the load method to be called automatically at the end of __init__(), but I am not sure on how to accomplish this. If I add self.load() at the end of __init__() for both classes the load() method of the subclass would be called twice, if try to create an instance of Sub, once from the superclass and once from the subclass.

If I instead put the call to self.load() only at the end of the init method of the superclass, it will only be called once but then the object hasn't been initialized to contain the attributes it needs for loading.

What I do want, when instantiating Sub, is for it to initialize all attributes in __init__ for both super and subclass, and call load() for both super and subclass. Whether its in the order

Super -> __init__(), Super -> load(), Sub -> __init__(), Sub -> load()

or

Super -> __init__(), Sub -> __init__(), Super -> load(), Sub -> load()

is not important. How can I accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answer is the combination you failed to enumerate:

class Super(object):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'init super'
        if self.__class__ == Super:
            self.load()
    def load(self):
        print 'load super'

class Sub(Super):
    def __init__(self):
        # always do super first in init
        super(Sub, self).__init__()
        print 'init sub'
        self.load()
    def load(self):
        # load is essentially an extension of init
        # so you still need to call super first
        super(Sub, self).load()
        print 'load sub'

sub = Sub()

If you actually want to instantiate super (it's not an abstract class) you need the if test in it's init. Otherwise, you cannot get the in-order semantics you want with your current class structure and initialization scheme.

Sub() will call Sub.__init__, which will call Super.__init__ (before doing anything).

Afterwards, __init__ on Sub will do it's thing.

Last, Sub.__init__ will call Sub.load, which will call Super.load (before doing anything), then do it's own work.

The "normal" way to do this would be

sub = Sub()
sub.load()
sup = Super()
sup.load()

Without the __init__ methods calling load at all. This is probably what I'd recommend if you really want to call up levels in load as it is essentially a second set of __init__s.

Edit: Read the comments about the failings in the previous two versions (and see the edits to see the older one). Here is another version, using a metaclass:

class Loader(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        if attrs.get('__init__'):
            attrs['_init'] = attrs['__init__']
            del attrs['__init__']
        if attrs.get('_init_'):
            attrs['__init__'] = lambda self: self._init_()
            attrs['_init'] = lambda self: None
        return super(Loader, cls).__new__(cls, name, bases, attrs)

class Super(object):
    __metaclass__ = Loader
    def _init_(self):
        print 'init super'
        self._init()
        self.load()

    def load(self):
        print 'load super'

class Sub(Super):
    def __init__(self):
        print 'init sub'

    def load(self):
        super(Sub, self).load()
        print 'load sub'


sub = Sub()
sup = Super()

This has a different restriction: All subclasses can act perfectly normally, except they can't call Sub.__init__, by using super().__init__(). I think it's possible to remove this restriction but I don't see how at this second without another layer of indirection somewhere.

share|improve this answer
    
What if you create an instance of Super()? –  robert Jul 25 '11 at 13:25
    
Please note my edit that deals with Super() being a concrete class. –  agf Jul 25 '11 at 13:47
1  
Your edited version still breaks if we have subclasses that don't need any custom initialisation so they don't override __init__ at all. –  Duncan Jul 25 '11 at 14:15
    
You're right, I just change the constraint, I didn't remove it. I think that the answer is that to be done right, this call structure has to be done from outside of the class, with classmethod as you describe in your comment or with two separate calls. –  agf Jul 25 '11 at 14:23

If you always want the __init__() to fully initialise the object and then call load() then I'd extract those two functions into separate methods:

class Super(object):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kw):
        self._initialise(*args, **kw)
        self.load()

    def _initialise(self, arg):
        self.arg = arg

    def load(self):
        ... as before ...


class Sub(Super):
    def _initialise(self, arg2, *args, **kwargs):
        super(Sub, self)._initialise(*args, **kwargs)
        self.arg2 = arg2

    def load(self):
        super(Sub, self).load()
        ... as before ...

Now you have one __init__() that you don't override and you are no longer mixing the two separate operations of initialisation and loading together.

share|improve this answer
    
This is nice, works just as desired, but you lose the normal behavior of initializing in __init__. If you were going to use this method, you'd be better off customizing Super.__new__ or Super.__metaclass__ to rewrite Sub.__init__ to Sub._initialize and a creating a wrapper Super.__init__ to call self._initialize. This way subclasses could be written normally with __init__ and it would all still "just work", as in my (slightly hackish) implementation. –  agf Jul 25 '11 at 13:58
    
I don't see a problem there; you've added constraints to how you want your __init__ to work, so any subclass has to follow those constraints. You could also do what you suggested by doing the construction in a class method: that way you don't have to override __new__ and the user creating the instance can choose whether or not to call load() automatically by calling something like inst = Sub.create_and_load() –  Duncan Jul 25 '11 at 14:13

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