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abstract class CustomControl : UserControl 
{
    protected abstract int DoStuff();
}

class DetailControl : CustomControl
{
    protected override int DoStuff()
    { 
        // do stuff
        return result;
    }
}

I dropped a DetailControl in a form. It renders correctly at runtime, but the designer displays an error and won't open because the base user control is abstract.

For the moment, I'm contemplating the following patch, which seems pretty wrong to me, as I want the child classes to be forced to implement the method.

class CustomControl : UserControl 
{
    protected virtual int DoStuff()
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("This method must be overriden.");
    }
}

class DetailControl : CustomControl
{
    protected override int DoStuff()
    { 
        // do stuff
        return result;
    }
}

Anyone has a better idea on how to work my way around this problem?

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1  
I had similar recently and went for having a separate interface that provided the methods I wanted. I also tried changing the base class to UserControl when I needed to edit it but it was messy. –  Deanna Jul 25 '11 at 14:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can use a TypeDescriptionProviderAttribute to provide a concrete design-time implementation for your abstract base class. See http://wonkitect.wordpress.com/2008/06/20/using-visual-studio-whidbey-to-design-abstract-forms/ for details.

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What we want

First, let's define the final class and the base abstract class.

public class MyControl : AbstractControl
...
public abstract class AbstractControl : UserControl // Also works for Form
...

Now all we need is a Description provider.

public class AbstractControlDescriptionProvider<TAbstract, TBase> : TypeDescriptionProvider
{
    public AbstractControlDescriptionProvider()
        : base(TypeDescriptor.GetProvider(typeof(TAbstract)))
    {
    }

    public override Type GetReflectionType(Type objectType, object instance)
    {
        if (objectType == typeof(TAbstract))
            return typeof(TBase);

        return base.GetReflectionType(objectType, instance);
    }

    public override object CreateInstance(IServiceProvider provider, Type objectType, Type[] argTypes, object[] args)
    {
        if (objectType == typeof(TAbstract))
            objectType = typeof(TBase);

        return base.CreateInstance(provider, objectType, argTypes, args);
    }
}

Finally we just apply a TypeDescriptionProvider attribute to the Abastract control.

[TypeDescriptionProvider(typeof(AbstractControlDescriptionProvider<AbstractControl, UserControl>))]
public abstract class AbstractControl : UserControl
...

And that's it. No middle control required.

And the provider class can be applied to as many Abstract bases as we want in the same solution.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked for me, although in my case I have two levels of abstract classes between my concrete subclass and UserControl. For both of the abstract classes I needed to provide the TypeDescriptionProvider with a TBase of UserControl. I renamed TBase to TFirstConcreteBase for explicit clarity for whoever comes after me. I had hoped the two original TBase declarations would chain together to get the right concrete base, but not so. Thanks for the help, @Juan. –  JMD Mar 12 at 14:54
    
Glad I could help @JMD –  Juan Carlos Diaz May 30 at 21:04

Another way to solve this is using pre-processing directives.

#if DEBUG
  public class UserControlAdmonEntidad : UserControl, IAdmonEntidad
#else
  public abstract class UserControlAdmonEntidad : UserControl, IAdmonEntidad
#endif
  {
    ...
    #if DEBUG
    public virtual object DoSomething()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException("This method must be implemented!!!");
    }
    #else
    public abstract object DoSomething();
    #endif

    ...
  }

See this link for more information regarding this topic: Inheriting a Form from an Abstract Class (and Making it Work in the Designer)

The same solution was also mentioned in this MSDN forum thread, in a briefer way: UserControl, Inherited Control, Abstract class, (C#)

Maybe is not the cleaner solution, but it's still the shortest I have found.

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The following is a generic solution that works for me, mostly. It is based on the article from another answer. Sometimes it will work, and I can design my UserControl, and then later I'll open the file and it will give the "The designer must create an instance of type 'MyApp.UserControlBase' but it cannot because the type is declared as abstract." I think I can fix it by cleaning, closing VS, reopening VS, and rebuilding. Right now it seems to be behaving. Good luck.

namespace MyApp
{
    using System;
    using System.ComponentModel;

    /// <summary>
    /// Replaces a class  of <typeparamref name="T"/> with a class of
    /// <typeparamref name="TReplace"/> during design.  Useful for
    /// replacing abstract <see cref="Component"/>s with mock concrete
    /// subclasses so that designer doesn't complain about trying to instantiate
    /// abstract classes (designer does this when you try to instantiate
    /// a class that derives from the abstract <see cref="Component"/>.
    /// 
    /// To use, apply a <see cref="TypeDescriptionProviderAttribute"/> to the 
    /// class <typeparamref name="T"/>, and instantiate the attribute with
    /// <code>SwitchTypeDescriptionProvider{T, TReplace})</code>.
    /// 
    /// E.g.:
    /// <code>
    /// [TypeDescriptionProvider(typeof(ReplaceTypeDescriptionProvider{T, TReplace}))]
    /// public abstract class T
    /// {
    ///     // abstract members, etc
    /// }
    /// 
    /// public class TReplace : T
    /// {
    ///     // Implement <typeparamref name="T"/>'s abstract members.
    /// }
    /// </code>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">
    /// The type replaced, and the type to which the 
    /// <see cref="TypeDescriptionProviderAttribute"/> must be
    /// applied
    /// </typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TReplace">
    /// The type that replaces <typeparamref name="T"/>.
    /// </typeparam>
    class ReplaceTypeDescriptionProvider<T, TReplace> : TypeDescriptionProvider
    {
        public ReplaceTypeDescriptionProvider() :
            base(TypeDescriptor.GetProvider(typeof(T)))
        {
            // Nada
        }

        public override Type GetReflectionType(Type objectType, object instance)
        {
            if (objectType == typeof(T))
            {
                return typeof(TReplace);
            }
            return base.GetReflectionType(objectType, instance);
        }

        public override object CreateInstance(
            IServiceProvider provider,
            Type objectType,
            Type[] argTypes,
            object[] args)
        {

            if (objectType == typeof(T))
            {
                objectType = typeof(TReplace);
            }

            return base.CreateInstance(provider, objectType, argTypes, args);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems to work great for editing the abstract UI in the designer but when I inherit from the abstract class and try to edit the sub class I get the same error about not being able to instantiate the abstract base class. Am I doing something stupid? –  Akuma Oct 30 '12 at 13:05
1  
I have the same problem. Try something like building solution, opening/editing the derived control (whether successful or not), closing the derived control, cleaning the solution, closing visual studio, reopen visual studio and solution, rebuild solution. The success/failure for me is intermittent. –  Carl G Oct 31 '12 at 1:42
    
+1 Yes cleaning and reopening after declaring the type provider worked –  yoel halb Aug 8 '13 at 2:06

I just make the abstract base class into a concrete one by defining the "abstract" methods as virtual, and throwing an exception in them, just in case any naughty derived classes try to call Base implementation.

e.g.

    class Base : UserControl
    {
        protected virtual void BlowUp()
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException("This method MUST be overriden by ALL derived classes.");
        }

    class Derived : Base
    {
        protected override void BlowUp()
        {
            // Do stuff, but don't call base implementation,
            // just like you wouldn't (can't actually) if the Base was really abstract. 
            // BTW - doesn't blow up any more  ;)
        }

The main practical difference between this and a real abstract base class is you get run time errors when calling the base implementation - whereas if the Base was actually abstract, the compiler would disallow an accidental calls to the Base class implementation. Which isn't a big deal for me and allows me to use the designer without worrying about more complex and time consuming work arounds suggested by others...

PS - Akuma - you should be able to edit your abstract UI class in the designer. I don't have time to check this right now, but it is my understanding that the designer only needs to instantiate the BASE class. As long as the base of the class you are designing is concrete, it doesn't matter what the designed class is.

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4  
Isn't this exactly the same as the patch I posted initially in my question? –  asmo Nov 14 '12 at 15:17

Even though this question is years old, I'd like to add what I've found.

If you don't want to touch your abstract base class, you can do this hack:

abstract class CustomControl : UserControl 
{
    protected abstract int DoStuff();
}

class BaseDetailControl : CustomControl
{
    protected override int DoStuff()
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("This method must be overriden.");
    }
}

class DetailControl : BaseDetailControl
{
    protected override int DoStuff()
    { 
        // do stuff
        return result;
    }
}

This way, your form inherits from a non-abstract base form and it's displayed in the designer! And you keep your abstract form, but only one more level up in the inheritance. Strange, isn't it?

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