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This is a question about Processing.org.

I am fading out previously drawn objects by drawing a semi-transparent white rectangle over the view for every frame.

However, it appears that they never fade to completely white. The fading has a fixed point at some noticeably non-white shade of grey. Same thing happens when trying to fade to black.

Is this a standard feature of how alpha-blending works in processing? Is there a relatively easy way around it, to achieve a completely white background (given enough steps)?

I imagined the resulting colour would be a linear combination of the colours that are blended, which means the limit should be white. Perhaps the non-white fixed point is an artefact of rounding?

Sample code illustrating the issue:

void setup() {
  size(300,300);
  background(0);
  noStroke();
  frameRate(15);
}

void draw() {
  fill(255,10);
  rect(0,0,width,height);
  fill(255);
  rect(0,0,50,50); // for comparison to white
}

edit: added java tag in hope of more attention

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Have you found a solution to this problem yet? –  LaserJesus May 17 '13 at 5:28
    
@LaserJesus Not really, I've stopped playing with it. The reason why it doesn't fade to complete white is that colours are encoded as integers (i.e. no fractional values are allowed). –  Szabolcs May 17 '13 at 14:19

1 Answer 1

I am not sure whats going on, it seems like you should be right and that if the number of rectangles drawn * the alpha value of those rectangles is greater than 255 it should be completely white. Anyways why not just redraw every frame (like i do by moving the background(0) line into the draw loop) and then just increase your alpha value. I think this path will give you more control in your animations in the future.

int a;

void setup() {
  size(300,300);
  noStroke();
  frameRate(15);
  a = 0;
}

void draw() {
  background(0);
  a += 1;
  if(a<=255){
    fill(255,a);
  }
  rect(0,0,width,height);
  fill(255);
  rect(0,0,50,50); // for comparison to white
}
share|improve this answer
    
My point was not to just fade out a rectangle, but to gradually fade out everything that was drawn on the screen so far, all of this while still drawing new things. Imagine moving a "ball" through the screen, and not deleting the ball drawn in the previous frame, but instead just "fading it out" a bit. The end result will be that the ball will leave a fading trail. This can make a nice effect for more complex animations. The approach you outlined can only produce a fading rectangle, not this effect. –  Szabolcs Oct 27 '11 at 16:18

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