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I think this is a C# beginner question, but I can't seem to find a correct solution.

I have a ClassOne object, which defines an event. I create a ClassTwo object, which is considered as a black box, which means I don't know whether it will register to any event or not. ClassTwo constructor registers to the event of ClassOne. The problem comes, when ClassTwo object goes out of scope. The garbage collector never deletes this object, because it never deregistered the event.

So I have two questions:

  1. Is there a way for ClassTwo object to know, when it goes out of scope? For an old C++ programmer this would be in the destructor, but with C# this doesn't work.

  2. Is there a debug tool which helps me to find such objects?

Here is a sample code to reproduce the issue:

    public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    static public ClassOne classOne = new ClassOne();
    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        ClassTwo classtwo = new ClassTwo();
    }

    private void buttonTest_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        GC.Collect();
    }
}
public class ClassOne
{
    public ClassOne()
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(this + " constructor");
    }

    ~ClassOne()
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(this + " destructor");
    }

    public delegate void UpdateFunc(object sender, EventArgs args);
    public event UpdateFunc OnUpdate;

}
public class ClassTwo
{
    public ClassTwo()
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(this + " constructor");
        MainWindow.classOne.OnUpdate += new ClassOne.UpdateFunc(classOne_OnUpdate);
    }

    void classOne_OnUpdate(object sender, EventArgs args)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    ~ClassTwo()
    {
        Trace.WriteLine(this + " destructor");
    }
}
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Are you looking to implement IDisposable‌​? –  Brad Christie Jul 25 '11 at 15:02
2  
+1 excellent question! Events are a lot trickier than they look at first glance. –  Mehrdad Jul 25 '11 at 15:03
    
On a side note, if you call a finalizer a destructor you should probably read Everybody thinks about garbage collection the wrong way. –  delnan Jul 25 '11 at 15:05
    
@delnan: I think the OP has understood the concept, it's just a slight nomenclature issue (i.e. getting used to). It doesn't mean the OP doesn't understand it correctly. –  Mehrdad Jul 25 '11 at 15:07
4  
FWIW, the official name in the first version of the language was destructor. It was changed because of the confusions it created. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jul 25 '11 at 15:11

3 Answers 3

  1. Not unless it implements IDisposable and the caller cooperates by calling Dispose correctly. (Of course, why wouldn't the caller cooperate?)

  2. Not that I've of. :( I think your best bet is to implement IDisposable and unregister on Dispose.

share|improve this answer

I would implement IDisposable on an object like this and unregister from the event in the Dispose method. You would use your object like this:

using(var two = new ClassTwo(classOne))
{
    // Do something with two
}
// object can now be garbage collected.

If the caller fails to call Dispose, you are out of luck.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I understand the concept of IDisposable, but this relies on the user of the object calling Dispose. Normally an object should clean things up by itself and not rely on the caller. Are you saying that there is no way of doing this? And what about my second question? Can the debugger help me finding these objects, that never get deleted? As a beginner I have now a fairly large program and accidentally found that some of my objects don't get deleted. –  MTR Jul 26 '11 at 5:54
    
@MTR: You can use a memory profiler to detect objects like this. Using IDisposable is the way to go - your object can't know when it isn't needed anymore. Only the caller can know. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 26 '11 at 6:12
    
Can you recommend a good and free memory profiler? And what do you think about this solution: blogs.msdn.com/b/greg_schechter/archive/2004/05/27/143605.aspx –  MTR Jul 26 '11 at 7:10
    
I suggest you just use one of the commercial memory profiles. They all offer a trial version, e.g. JetBrains dotTrace. The solution discussed in the blog post is overkill in most scenarios, because most of the time, implementing IDisposable is enough. If this doesn't work for you for some reason, go with the solution in the blog post. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 26 '11 at 7:36

As other people have mentioned, the Dispose pattern is the way to address this issue. If the ClassTwo object lives for a short time, you can use the C# using statement to ensure Dispose is called after you are finished using the object:

using (var foo = new ClassTwo())
{
    foo.Bar();
}

In order to find the root cause of such issues, you need to use a memory profiler. dotTrace has already been mentioned, and another good one is the SciTech Memory Profiler. What you need to find is the Root Path to the object that you think should be garbage collected, but isn't. The root paths are the reason why the object is not being collected - because through transitive references, an object that's guaranteed to be alive (a GC Root) is referencing your object that you want to be dead.

These memory profilers are very helpful in identifying which GC roots are causing you trouble, and what the reference paths are from the root to your object. Somewhere along that root path will be a reference that is out of place, and is the cause of the problem.

In your code, the cause of the ClassTwo object not being collected could be either the fact that MainWindow has a static reference to the ClassOne object, or that the event handler from ClassOne to ClassTwo has not been unhooked. Static references are one example of GC Roots - so everything classOne references will be alive until that static reference in MainWindow is changed.

Whether the static or the event handler is the problem depends on the scenario of your application - should the ClassOne object also be collected - is it wrong to have a static reference to it? Or is the static reference desired behaviour - is classOne a long lived object and classTwo a short lived one, in which case, classTwo should be Disposed when its life is over, and the Dispose should unhook the event handler.

This is a good article to learn about the .Net GC, written by Jeffrey Richter: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/bb985010.aspx. It's a bit old now, there have been new additions to the GC over recent years, but it's a great place to start.

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