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Need to dynamically package some files into a .zip to create a SCORM package, anyone know how this can be done using code? Is it possible to build the folder structure dynamically inside of the .zip as well?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You don't have to use an external library anymore. System.IO.Packaging has classes that can be used to drop content into a zip file. Its not simple, however. Here's a blog post with an example (its at the end; dig for it).

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+1 for the extremely useful link that the author is keeping up to date. –  Jeff Sternal Jul 6 '09 at 15:59
    
Take also a look to this link weblogs.asp.net/dneimke/archive/2005/02/25/380273.aspx –  daitangio Feb 1 '11 at 13:46

DotNetZip is nice for this. Working example

You can write the zip directly to the Response.OutputStream. The code looks like this:

    Response.Clear();
    Response.BufferOutput = false; // for large files...
    System.Web.HttpContext c= System.Web.HttpContext.Current;
    String ReadmeText= "Hello!\n\nThis is a README..." + DateTime.Now.ToString("G"); 
    string archiveName= String.Format("archive-{0}.zip", 
                                      DateTime.Now.ToString("yyyy-MMM-dd-HHmmss")); 
    Response.ContentType = "application/zip";
    Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "filename=" + archiveName);

    using (ZipFile zip = new ZipFile())
    {
        // filesToInclude is an IEnumerable<String>, like String[] or List<String>
        zip.AddFiles(filesToInclude, "files");            

        // Add a file from a string
        zip.AddEntry("Readme.txt", "", ReadmeText);
        zip.Save(Response.OutputStream);
    }
    // Response.End();  // no! See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1087777
    Response.Close();

DotNetZip is free.

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You could take a look at SharpZipLib. And here's a sample.

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beat me to it 15 seconds... –  JoshBerke Mar 25 '09 at 14:33

This code on codeproject could be used in a asp.net app to achieve what you need:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/ZipStorer.aspx

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I have used a free component from chilkat for this: http://www.chilkatsoft.com/zip-dotnet.asp. Does pretty much everything I have needed however I am not sure about building the file structure dynamically.

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We used this component in our company too. Based on errors in the component some of our extremly stressed services caused an EngineException. After an Microsoft Support Ticket we decided to switch to SharpZLib. This was 2 years ago. I do not know how good the component is today? –  Michael Piendl Mar 25 '09 at 15:00
    
We've never had any problems with it however is used in export services which generally run at the most every hour, but typically daily. The encryption is useful as well –  Macros Mar 25 '09 at 16:58

DotNetZip is very easy to use... Creating Zip files in ASP.Net

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Creating ZIP file "on the fly" would be done using our Rebex ZIP component.

The following sample describes it fully, including creating a subfolder:

// prepare MemoryStream to create ZIP archive within
using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
{
    // create new ZIP archive within prepared MemoryStream
    using (ZipArchive zip = new ZipArchive(ms))
    {            
         // add some files to ZIP archive
         zip.Add(@"c:\temp\testfile.txt");
         zip.Add(@"c:\temp\innerfile.txt", @"\subfolder");

         // clear response stream and set the response header and content type
         Response.Clear();
         Response.ContentType = "application/zip";
         Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "filename=sample.zip");

         // write content of the MemoryStream (created ZIP archive) to the response stream
         ms.WriteTo(Response.OutputStream);
    }
}

// close the current HTTP response and stop executing this page
HttpContext.Current.ApplicationInstance.CompleteRequest();
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