Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a question I need to ask you. Here is part of my script:

scan=file('indice.txt','r')
for i_L in range(10):
    for line in scan:
        a,b,c=line.split()
        do something ...
        ... ...
    print something
scan.close()

indice.txt is a file containing 3 columns of real numbers.

The main problem is that when the outer loop over i_L executes for the first value of i_L, the loop is broken and only one value is shown in the output.

anyone can help?

share|improve this question
1  
Whats this? Python? If so use the tags available. – Ash Burlaczenko Jul 25 '11 at 15:30
1  
you should probably tag this with whatever language you are using. – Randy Jul 25 '11 at 15:31
    
Pleas how us more of your code - what you've given us isn't quite enough for us to figure out what's going on. EG do you have a "continue" or a "break" somewhere in your code? What is it that you are printing out? You have three columns in your file, but how many lines are there? – Taryn East Nov 16 '11 at 17:36
    
I think you have to close and reopen indices.txt for each i_L, or you can read/store into list or something before ou go into i_L loop – yosukesabai Nov 17 '11 at 16:12

Before you start looping over the lines in the file again, you should seek the file to the beginning:

scan=file('indice.txt','r')
for i_L in range(10):
    for line in scan:
        a,b,c=line.split()
        do something ...



        ...
    print something
    scan.seek(0)
scan.close()

See file.seek.

You should also consider caching the lines first and then working with the cache.

share|improve this answer

You can also read all line at once into list, and keep using it (assuming this indice.txt is not like 500GB data)

scan=file('indice.txt','r')
lst_scan = list(scan)
scan.close()
for i_L in range(10):
    for line in lst_scan:
        a,b,c=line.split()
        do something ...



        ...
    print something
share|improve this answer
for line in file:
    ...

is a shorthand for

for line in iter(file.readline, ""):
    ...

So you can see actually it call readline which move the file's current position just as other file operations. It won't go back to the beginning of the file when you iterate again, unless you set the current position manually, like:

yourfile.seek(0)

Also if you don't want to seek from the last position but not from the beginning, 2 "for..in.." is not a good way either, because it may have buffer of it, the right way to this is:

  it = iter(file)
  for line in it:
      if line == "\n":
          break
  for line in it:
      print line,

Please refer to PEP234 for more about this: http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0234/ It explains how different kinds of iterators work. And what happens when you iterate a file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.