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Suppose we have an instance of an anonymous type:

var b = new { 
    Length = 5
    , Width = 6 
    // 40 more properties
};

and we want to create an instance of a different anonymous type, which has all the same members as the first type, with the same values as the first instance, but with one additional member:

var d = new {
    b.Length
    , b.Width
    // the same 40 more properties, with values from b
    , Jiffle = "custard"
};

It's nice that the compiler will automagically work out what we want to call the members of d's type, just from this initializer. But is there any way we can avoid have to explicitly refer to all 42 members that we want to copy over?

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7  
I don't think there is a simple way, and it certainly seems like an abuse of anonymous types. If you need that many fields and that much commonality between types, just declare the types yourself. If you're looking to add these fields dynamically, ExpandoObject (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) could help. –  dlev Jul 25 '11 at 15:45
    
While I agree with @dlev, a workaround would be to simply do this: var d = new { b, Jiffle = "xyz" }; –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 25 '11 at 15:49
1  
    
@dlev I've pulled your comment out into an answer but if you want to post it yourself and get 25 rep please feel free to do so :) –  AakashM Jul 26 '13 at 9:25

3 Answers 3

This sounds like you need well defined types with an inheritance pattern.

What your saying above is that d is an extension of b or:

class b
{
    Length = 5
    , Width = 6 
    // 40 more properties
}

class d : b
{
    Jiffle = "custard"
}
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Composition?

var d = new { B = b, Jiffle = "custard" }

d.B.Length;
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Sorry @Daniel Hilgarth, didn't see your comment before I posted this. –  tvanfosson Jul 25 '11 at 15:53
    
No problem. I didn't find it worthy of an answer, so I just posted it as a comment. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 25 '11 at 15:55
    
@Daniel Hilgarth. Gee, that makes me feel better. :-) –  tvanfosson Jul 25 '11 at 15:58
    
Haha, I am sorry. I just had to post that ;-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 25 '11 at 16:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Pulling dlev's comment out into an answer so I can accept it:

I don't think there is a simple way, and it certainly seems like an abuse of anonymous types. If you need that many fields and that much commonality between types, just declare the types yourself. If you're looking to add these fields dynamically, ExpandoObject could help.

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