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I have the following enum definition (in C#):

public enum ELogLevel
{
    General = -1,  // Should only be used in drop-down box in Merlinia Administrator log settings
    All = 0,       // Should not be used as a level, only as a threshold, effectively same as Trace
    Trace = 1,
    Debug = 2,
    Info = 3,
    Warn = 4,
    Error = 5,
    Fatal = 6,
    Off = 7        // Should not be used as a level, only as a threshold
}

Now, when I do an Enum.GetNames() on this type I get a string array with 9 elements as expected, but the order is All, Trace, ... , Off, General, which is not what I was expecting.

Here's the MSDN documentation for Enum.GetNames():

"Remarks: The elements of the return value array are sorted by the values of the enumerated constants."

What's going on here? I can change my program to take this "functionality" into account, but I'd kind of like to know why .NET is doing what it's doing.

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I would suggest submitting a bug report to Microsoft. –  Jonathan Allen Jul 25 '11 at 16:40
    
It's not a bug anymore, it's a feature that is now documented: "The elements of the array are sorted by the binary values of the enumeration constants (that is, by their unsigned magnitude)." –  Jason Aug 9 '13 at 14:18
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2 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

This is a known bug with both GetNames() and GetValues() that was reported here, but ended up getting closed as won't fix:

Yes, this method indeed has a bug where it returns the array of enum values sorted as unsigned-types (-2 is 0xFFFFFFFE and -1 is 0xFFFFFFFF in two's complement, that's why they are showing up at the end of the list) instead of returning values sorted by their signed-types.

Unfortunately, we cannot change the sort order of GetValues because we will break all existing .NET programs that have been written to depend on the current sorting behavior [...]

Looks like you'll have to reorder the values yourself.

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"existing .NET programs that have been written to depend on the current sorting behavior" And this is why you don't huddle onto implementation details. –  BoltClock Jul 25 '11 at 16:49
1  
Surely if the implementation always-has-been and always-will-be broken in this way then it would make sense for MS to update the documentation so that it matches the actual behaviour. –  LukeH Jul 25 '11 at 16:58
    
@LukeH: Exactly. Even the bug reporter said the same. –  BoltClock Jul 25 '11 at 16:59
    
@LukeH: They eventually did. "The elements of the array are sorted by the binary values of the enumeration constants (that is, by their unsigned magnitude)." –  Jason Aug 9 '13 at 14:19
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Depending on how the sorting occurs, it may be that it is sorting the values as if they were unsigned, in which case, -1 = 0xffffffff, which is of course greater than 7.

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1  
It's certainly possible, and it seems to explain things, but it would certainly be odd given that the default underlying type for an enum is int. –  Jason Jul 25 '11 at 16:40
    
It seems that my guess is confirmed by the answer by BoltClock below. –  Iridium Jul 25 '11 at 16:43
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