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Having heard about Perl for year I decided to give it a few hours of my time to see how much I could pick up. I got through the basics fine and then got to loops. As a test I wanted to see if I could build a script to recurse through all alphanumerical values of up to 4 characters. I had written a PHP code that did the same thing some time ago so I took the same concept and used it. However when I run the script it puts "a" as the first 3 values and then only loops through the last digit. Anyone see what I am doing wrong?

#!/usr/local/bin/perl 

$chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
$chars .= "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
$chars .= "0123456789";

@charset = split(//, $chars);

$charset_length = scalar(@charset);

sub recurse
{
 ($width, $position, $base_string) = @_;

for ($i = 0; $i < $charset_length; ++$i) {
    $base = $base_string . $charset[$i];
    if ($position < $width - 1) {
        $pos = $position + 1;
        recurse($width, $pos, $base);
    }
    print $base;
    print "\n";
}
}

recurse(4, 0, '');

This is what I get when I run it:

aaaa
aaab
aaac
aaad
aaae
aaaf
aaag
aaah
aaai
aaaj
aaak
aaal
aaam
aaan
aaao
aaap
aaaq
aaar
aaas
aaat
aaau
aaav
aaaw
aaax
aaay
aaaz
aaaA
aaaB
aaaC
aaaD
aaaE
aaaF
aaaG
aaaH
aaaI
aaaJ
aaaK
aaaL
aaaM
aaaN
aaaO
aaaP
aaaQ
aaaR
aaaS
aaaT
aaaU
aaaV
aaaW
aaaX
aaaY
aaaZ
aaa0
aaa1
aaa2
aaa3
aaa4
aaa5
aaa6
aaa7
aaa8
aaa9
aaa9
aaa9
aaa9
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1  
You pass 4 arguments on the last line but only use 3 in the sub. Not that it's causing your error but just sayin. –  JohnKlehm Jul 25 '11 at 17:17
    
still has the same prob :/ I fixed the code above. –  Chris Jul 25 '11 at 17:19
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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

You've been bitten by non strict scoping, this code does what it should (note the use strict at the top and the subsequent use of my to guarantee variable scoping).

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $chars = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
$chars .= "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
$chars .= "0123456789";

my @charset = split(//, $chars);

my $charset_length = scalar(@charset);

sub recurse {
    my ($width, $position, $base_string) = @_;

    for (my $i = 0; $i < $charset_length; ++$i) {
        my $base = $base_string . $charset[$i];

        if ($position < $width - 1) {
            my $pos = $position + 1;
            recurse($width, $pos, $base);
        }

        print $base;
        print "\n";
    }
}

recurse(4, 0, '');
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Already well answered, but a more idiomatic approach would be:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub recurse {
    my ($width, $base_string, $charset) = @_;

    if (length($base_string) >= $width) {
        print "$base_string\n";
    }
    else {
        recurse($width, $base_string . $_, $charset) for @$charset;
    }
}

my @charset = ('a'..'z', 'A'..'Z', '0'..'9');
recurse(4, '', \@charset);

There's no need to pass position; it's implicit in the width of the base string passed in. The charset, on the other hand, should be passed in rather than having the subroutine use an external variable.

Alternatively, since the width and character set stay constant, generate a closure that references them:

use strict;
use warnings;

sub make_recurser {
    my ($width, $charset) = @_;
    my $recurser;
    $recurser = sub {
        my ($base_string) = @_;

        if (length($base_string) >= $width) {
            print "$base_string\n";
        }
        else {
            $recurser->($base_string . $_) for @$charset;
        }
    }
}

my @charset = ('a'..'z', 'A'..'Z', '0'..'9');
my $recurser = make_recurser(4, \@charset);
$recurser->('');

Alternatively, just:

print "$_\n" for glob(('{' . join(',', 'a'..'z', 'A'..'Z', '0'..'9') . '}') x 4);
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It has to do with the scope of the variables, you're still changing the same vars when you're calling the recursion. The keyword 'my' declares the variables local to the subroutine. (http://perl.plover.com/FAQs/Namespaces.html)

I always use perl with 'use strict;' declared, forcing me to decide on the scope of the variables.

sub recurse {
  my ($width, $position, $base_string) = @_;
  for (my $i = 0; $i < $charset_length; ++$i) {
    my $base = $base_string . $charset[$i];
    if ($position < $width - 1) {
      my $pos = $position + 1;
      recurse($width, $pos, $base);
    }
    print $base;
    print " ";
  }
}
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You seem to be running into some scoping issues. Perl is very flexible, so it is taking a guess at what you want because you haven't told it what you want. One of the first things you'll learn is to add use strict; as for your first statement after the shebang. It will point out the variables that are not being explicitly defined, as well as any variables that are accessed before being created (helps with misspelled variables, etc).

If you make your code look like this, you'll see why you are getting your errors:

sub recurse {
    ($width, $position, $base_string) = @_;

    for ($i = 0; $i < $charset_length; ++$i) {
        $base = $base_string . $charset[$i];
        if ($position < $width - 1) {
            $pos = $position + 1;
            recurse($width, $pos, $base);
        }
        # print "$base\n";
    }
    print "$position\n";
}

This should output:

3
3
3
3

Because you are not scoping $position correctly with my, you aren't getting a new variable each recurse, you are re-using the same one. Toss a use strict; in there, and fix the errors you get, and the code should be good.

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I realize that you're just tinkering with recursion. But as long as you're having fun comparing implementations between two languages you may as well also see how the CPAN can extend your tool set.

If you don't care about the order, you can generate all 13,388,280 permutations of ( 'a'..'z', 'A..'Z', '0'..'9' ) taken four at a time with the CPAN module, Algorithm::Permute

Here is an example of how that code may look.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Algorithm::Permute;

my $p = Algorithm::Permute->new( 
    [ 'a' .. 'z', 'A' .. 'Z', '0' .. '9' ], # Set of...
    4 # <---- at a time.
);

while ( my @res = $p->next ) {
    print @res, "\n";
}

The new() method accepts an array ref that enumerates the character set or list of what to permute. Its second argument is how many at a time to include in the permutation. So you're essentially taking 62 items 4 at a time. Then use the next() method to iterate through the permutations. The rest is just window dressing.

The same thing could be reduced to the following Perl one-liner:

perl -MAlgorithm::Permute -e '$p=Algorithm::Permute->new(["a".."z","A".."Z",0..9],4);print @r, "\n" while @r=$p->next;'

There is also a section on permutation, along with additional examples in perlfaq4. It includes several examples and lists some additional modules that handle the details for you. One of Perl's strengths is the size and completeness of the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (the CPAN).

share|improve this answer
    
he doesn't want permutation, though –  ysth Jul 26 '11 at 4:46
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