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Assuming mpstat-log.txt file below, how can I parse the results of a file and get the %idle field for the first 4 CPUs 0-3. My guess is this is a job for grep, sed, cut, or awk but I am not experienced enough to know which is the best utility(s) to use for the job.

#!/bin/bash

for cpuIndex in {0..3}
do
   # Get percent idle from line of specified  cpuIndex
   cpuPercentIdle= # How to get a desired line and space separated field number?
   # Can you do math in a bash script ?
   cpuPercentUsed=$((100 - $cpuPercentId))
   echo "CPU $cpuIndex : Idle=$cpuPercentIdle, Used=$cpuPercentUsed"
   done
done

Script Output:

CPU 0 : Idle=45.18, Used=54.82
CPU 1 : Idle=96.33, Used=3.67
CPU 2 : Idle=95.65, Used=4.35
CPU 3 : Idle=72.09, Used=27.91

File:mpstat-log.txt

Average:     CPU   %user   %nice    %sys %iowait    %irq   %soft  %steal   %idle    intr/s
Average:     all   10.95    0.00    0.42    0.00    0.04    0.25    0.00   88.34   1586.71
Average:       0   51.50    0.00    3.32    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   45.18      0.00
Average:       1    3.67    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   96.33      2.66
Average:       2    4.35    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   95.65      0.00
Average:       3   27.57    0.00    0.33    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00   72.09    997.34
Average:       4    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00     10.96
Average:       5    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00      0.00
Average:       6    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00  100.00      0.00
Average:       7    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    0.00    1.67    0.00   98.33    575.75

Thanks in advance for any guidance and tips!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted
$ awk '$2~/^[0-3]$/ {printf "CPU %d : Idle=%.2f, Used=%.2f\n",$2,$10,100-$10}' mpstat-log.txt
CPU 0 : Idle=45.18, Used=54.82
CPU 1 : Idle=96.33, Used=3.67
CPU 2 : Idle=95.65, Used=4.35
CPU 3 : Idle=72.09, Used=27.91
share|improve this answer
    
If there are > 10 CPUs, the regex /[0-3]/ will match too many – glenn jackman Jul 25 '11 at 18:53
    
Thank you all for the valuable information! – Ed . Jul 25 '11 at 19:41
    
@glenn good point. Updated answer to cover more cases. Thanks – Shawn Chin Jul 26 '11 at 9:17
    
And updated again to simplify it based on answer by @Fredrik – Shawn Chin Jul 26 '11 at 9:20

Just about all the tools you mention can do the job one way or another. Here's one with awk...

awk '{ if ( $2 <= 3 ) print $10; }' mpstat-log.txt

share|improve this answer
3  
The more awk-ish way to write this is: awk '$2 <= 3 {print $10}' – glenn jackman Jul 25 '11 at 18:51

Solution using awk:

{ if($2 ~ /[0-3]/) {
    print $10
  }
}

gives:

$ awk -f t.awk input
45.18
96.33
95.65
72.09

In pure bash, something like this perhaps:

#!/bin/bash

while read -a ARRAY
do
    if [[ "${ARRAY[1]}" =~ [0-3] ]]; then
        echo ${ARRAY[9]}
    fi
done < input

gives:

45.18
96.33
95.65
72.09

Bash cannot to floating point arithmetic, for that you can use bc. See this link for how you can use bc to do the math for you.

share|improve this answer
    
If there are > 10 CPUs, the regex /[0-3]/ will match too many – glenn jackman Jul 25 '11 at 18:53
1  
@glenn jackman - true, limit it to a single digit using /^[0-3]$/ instead. – Fredrik Pihl Jul 25 '11 at 19:02
    
Thank you all! The stuff that is possible to cobble together with grep, awk, sed, etc. makes my head spin. While very powerful, I feel sorry for the next Linux newbie that comes along to try and maintain. I guess I just need to leave descriptive comments. – Ed . Jul 25 '11 at 19:43

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