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I am looking to create a site composed of different panels. Let's say we have 4 panels. Each panel takes up the whole screen at a given point in time, and looks something similar to this

--------------------------------
|     home     ||     about    |
|    a menu    ||    a menu    |
|              ||              |
--------------------------------
--------------------------------
|    contact   ||     jobs     |
|    a menu    ||    a menu    |
|              ||              |
--------------------------------

Let's say I now click on the "jobs" link through the home page. I'd like the screen to scroll with an animation vertically, to the bottom right hand corner of the container that contains all the items.

This is not that much of a problem, and I am aware I can achieve that with a plugin such as ScrollTo.

Now imagine that instead of just 4 pages, I have 16. This plugin can easily be scaled, but since so many elements exist on the page (each panel contains images, text, menu, titles, etc...), the site slows down substantially.

I can resolve this problem when I am already on a given page, by hiding all the other pages -- but how can I handle all the elements while animating from one panel to another? Any ideas for implementation?

Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
It is a bad idea to load all of this to the dom initially. You have to consider what is more important, a little load time and a fast page post load, or no load time (except up front) and a very slow page. There is a direct relation between the number of elements in the dom and how fast the page reacts. This sort of page would likely be near unusable in older browsers like IE7. –  aepheus Aug 3 '11 at 22:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

2Cents:

  • by default all panels except the active are hidden AND have an additional css class (e.g. "panel-simplified")
  • panel-simplified reduces the layout to the absolute minimum: no advanced css3 techniques, only selected content is shown, maybe even dummy content
  • on click the target panel gains full beauty / loses panel-simplified
  • only the necessary panels, which are "passed along" are shown (min: 2panels, max: ~ 10 panels (0,0) -> (4/4))

e.g. State before (0,0) -> (2,2). Hidden panels without a label.

----------------------------------------------------------------
|    (0,0)     ||     (1,0)    ||     (2,0)    ||     (3,0)    |
|    FULL      ||      SIMP    ||              ||              |
----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------
|    (0,1)     ||     (1,1)    ||     (2,1)    ||     (3,1)    |
|     SIMP     ||     SIMP     ||      SIMP    ||              |
----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------
|    (0,2)     ||     (1,2)    ||     (2,2)    ||     (3,2)    |
|              ||     SIMP     ||      FULL    ||              |
----------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------------------------------------
|    (0,3)     ||     (1,3)    ||     (2,3)    ||     (3,3)    |
|              ||              ||              ||              |
----------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, exactly the algorithm I ended up implementing. The only problem I'm faced with now is calclulating which elements are going to be 'passed along' -- the scrollTo plugin doesn't seem to have any indication of that. Any ideas for implementation? –  yuval Aug 4 '11 at 2:43
    
Sry, would have loved to answer quicker. But truely had no time at all. Anyway, I've you are still looking for something. This might be a first step / quick solution. A bit hackish to say the least, but it might fit your needs. jsfiddle.net/SunnyRed/bg9ct Best of Luck. –  SunnyRed Aug 7 '11 at 0:58
    
WHOA! Thanks you SO much. Can't wait to try it out, but it'll have to wait for the afternoon (it's 3AM here now :)) –  yuval Aug 9 '11 at 10:00

Don't load everything to the DOM, use ajax and pull in what you need and remove what you don't. I worked on a site very similar to what you describe once and I went the "hide everything in the dom" route, I eventually had to re-write parts of it to use ajax because the page was simply taking too long to load.

share|improve this answer
    
but then when I click, say, the "about" link from the home page, that page was not yet loaded. I'm wondering how to handle all the elements at once. Could you give a specific example? –  yuval Jul 25 '11 at 18:51
    
What exactly do you mean by "All the elements at once" ? An overly simplistic way is $("#about-link").click(function(){ $("#secondary-div").load("/about"); // do fancy animation here to fade/transition the main content out and make the newly loaded about div the primary content }); –  sjobe Jul 26 '11 at 16:45
    
I mean that the if the content hasn't loaded yet: A) how would I know where it is (pixel-wise, on the page) B) I'll have to wait for it to load after clicking on the link -- the content should load ASAP. Is there a way to load the content to the computer, but not the DOM? And will that even solve my problem? –  yuval Jul 28 '11 at 22:33
    
A) You specify where you want it to load [e.g. absolutely positioned, -10000 px or something, then animate its position to show up on the screen] B) A little wait is not bad as long as you display some kind of loading message/animation. You'd be surprised how fast pages can load actually. The "DOM" is "The computer" if you mean locally to the users machine. You can go this route and then benchmark it using yslow or something to see what you can improve. Infact I suggest you start this way, then ajaxify it if it's what you're more comfy with –  sjobe Jul 29 '11 at 16:06

not sure how's your html code is, but i agree with sjobe suggestion.

i'm guessing you have a menu like so:

<ul id='menu'>
    <li><a href='#home'>home</a></li>
    <li><a href='#about'>about</a></li>
    <li><a href='#contact'>contact</a></li>
    <li><a href='#jobs'>jobs</a></li>
</ul>

and some divs like so:

<div id='container'>
    <div id='home'></div>
    <div id='about'></div>
    <div id='contact'></div>
    <div id='jobs'></div>
</div>

now the javascript:

// when DOM's ready
$(document).ready(function() {
    // get the current hash or default to #home if none
    hash = window.location.hash ? window.location.hash : '#home';

    // construct the file name to load
    file = hash.replace('#', '/') + '.html';
    // load the file to the div
    $(hash).load(file);
    // and scroll to it
    $.scrollTo(hash, 800, {easing:'elasout'});

    // and create handler for menu click
    $('#menu a').click(function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        hash = this.hash;
        $.scrollTo(hash, 800, {easing:'elasout'});
        });
    });

// when page (incl scripts, styles, images, etc) ready
$(window).load(function() {
    // iterate through each menu
    $('#menu a').each(function() {
        // get its hash
        hash = this.hash;
        // construct the file name to load
        file = hash.replace('#', '/') + '.html';
        // preload the file to the div
        $(hash).load(file);
        });
    });
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the elaborate explanation, but this doesn't address my question of dealing with multiple pages loaded into the dom. –  yuval Aug 4 '11 at 2:40

your elements should have meaningful id attributes.You should have a dictionary that holds position info for all those id's. and then you can calculate the desired direction of move by those position values . Like

 move from (2,4) to (4,2) 
so you calculate that you will move downwards and left. And for the slowing problem, you should only have the html elements on these panels(and a background image identifier at least) , and you can load the info with ajax calls after you make the replacement animation.

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