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What is the best way in Python to determine what values in two ranges overlap?

For example:

x = range(1,10)
y = range(8,20)

(The answer I am looking for would be the integers 8 and 9.)

Given a range, x, what is the best way to iterate through another range, y and output all values that are shared by both ranges? Thanks in advance for the help.

EDIT:

As a follow-up, I realized that I also need to know if x does or does not overlap y. I am looking for a way to iterate through a list of ranges and and do a number of additional things with range that overlap. Is there a simple True/False statement to accomplish this?

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Specify the characteristics of the range (step always equal +1? or can it be -2?) –  Dor Jul 25 '11 at 19:23
    
My ranges are all in +1 steps. –  drbunsen Jul 25 '11 at 19:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Try with set intersection:

>>> x = range(1,10)
>>> y = range(8,20)
>>> xs = set(x)
>>> ys = set(y)
>>> xs.intersection(ys)
set([8, 9])
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1  
I find that intersection with operator & is much more intuitive. –  schlamar Jul 25 '11 at 19:31
    
@ms4py Sometimes. Try [1,2] & [2,3]. The intersection method of set assures you that you can do it. –  joaquin Jul 25 '11 at 19:35
    
Fantastic, thanks for the help. I think the intersection method will work perfectly. Also, is there a way to just ask Python if any values or x are in y? A simple True/False statement? –  drbunsen Jul 25 '11 at 20:12
    
@dr.bunsen look at stackoverflow.com/questions/6821329/… . You can also do bool(x.intersection(y)) (being x, y sets) –  joaquin Jul 25 '11 at 20:18
    
@joaquin Thank you very much for the help. I'm going to read the references you suggested and see if I can solve my problem. Thanks again! –  drbunsen Jul 25 '11 at 20:30

If the step is always +1 (which is the default for range) the following should be more efficient than converting each list to a set or iterating over either list:

range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)
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You can use sets for that, but be aware that set(list) removes all duplicate entries from the list:

>>> x = range(1,10)
>>> y = range(8,20)
>>> list(set(x) & set(y))
[8, 9]
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1  
Well, ranges don't contain duplicates anyway. Also, using xrange is possible saves some (potentially much, depending on range sizes) memory during construction. –  delnan Jul 25 '11 at 19:30

One option is to just use list comprehension like:

x = range(1,10) 
y = range(8,20) 

z = [i for i in x if i in y]
print z
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2  
As far as I can see xrange.__contains__ from Python 2.x doesn't have this optimization. This is sloow under python 2.7: rng = xrange(20, 1000000000); 10 in rng –  Mikhail Korobov Jun 13 '12 at 10:25
2  
'10 in rng' (False) is slow and '100 in rng' (True) is fast under Python 2.7; both are fast under Python 3.2. –  Mikhail Korobov Jun 13 '12 at 10:32

For "if x does or does not overlap y" :

for a,b,c,d in ((1,10,10,14),
                (1,10,9,14),
                (1,10,4,14),
                (1,10,4,10),
                (1,10,4,9),
                (1,10,4,7),
                (1,10,1,7),
                (1,10,-3,7),
                (1,10,-3,2),
                (1,10,-3,1),
                (1,10,-11,-5)):
    x = range(a,b)
    y = range(c,d)
    print 'x==',x
    print 'y==',y
    b = not ((x[-1]<y[0]) or (y[-1]<x[0]))
    print '    x %s y' % ("does not overlap","   OVERLAPS  ")[b]
    print

result

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [10, 11, 12, 13]
    x does not overlap y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0, 1]
    x    OVERLAPS   y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-3, -2, -1, 0]
    x does not overlap y

x== [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
y== [-11, -10, -9, -8, -7, -6]
    x does not overlap y

Edit 1

Speeds comparison:

from time import clock

x = range(-12,15)
y = range(-5,3)
te = clock()
for i in xrange(100000):
    w = set(x).intersection(y)
print '                     set(x).intersection(y)',clock()-te


te = clock()
for i in xrange(100000):
    w = range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)
print 'range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1)',clock()-te

result

                     set(x).intersection(y) 0.951059981087
range(max(x[0], y[0]), min(x[-1], y[-1])+1) 0.377761978129

The ratio of these execution's times is 2.5

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