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Why does Aptana with either validator (Mozilla or JSlint) complain about this code:

var collectionOfValues = {
    key0 : value0;
    key1 : value1;
    key2 : value2;
};

It works fine with , but not with ;

Even code from The Good Parts won't validate:

var myObject = {
    value: 0;
    increment: function (inc) {
        this.value += typeof inc === 'number' ? inc : 1;
    }
};
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3 Answers 3

It's complaining because that's a syntax error. In an object literal, you separate terms with commas, not semicolons.

var collectionOfValues = {
    key0 : value0,
    key1 : value1,
    key2 : value2
};

Both your examples would be rejected by every JavaScript implementation I know of.

var myObject = {
    value: 0,
    increment: function (inc) {
        this.value += typeof inc === 'number' ? inc : 1;
    }
};

This has been the case essentially since the Big Bang.

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Great, thank you for the confirmation. Just very strange that the code within JavaScript - The Good Parts is wrong, and the documentation for a new API that mentions using JSLint for validation is also wrong, in the same way. It seemed like if they were both saying ; were ok then maybe they really were ok. –  Jason Doucette Aug 4 '11 at 5:18
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because proper syntax would be

var collectionOfValues = {
    key0 : value0,
    key1 : value1,
    key2 : value2,
};

for a js object

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4  
the , after value2 is not valid –  Bastian Jul 25 '11 at 21:10
    
sue it is :P it'll run. It's not a good practice, but it'll run. I purposefully left it in there as a juxtaposed to the original, highlighting the one thing that when changed made a difference. –  Joseph Marikle Jul 25 '11 at 21:21
1  
@Joseph actually IE6 won't be able to run that enterprisedojo.com/2010/12/19/… –  Greg Guida Jul 25 '11 at 21:30
    
lol thanks for the link, Greg. XD I didn't know (but probably should have guessed) that IE would have an issue with it. –  Joseph Marikle Jul 25 '11 at 21:32
    
Thanks for the information. I know in C# that arrays can have the trailing comma, and I never knew why, until I started having to modify arrays in code a lot, and that trailing comma sure comes in handy, since you can just add it, and then modify line-by-line and not worry about which line is last, since they all have commas. In any case, I wish to code JavaScript the 'right way', so thanks. I wonder if JSLint catches this trailing comma? I would assume so. Actually it doesn't... Hmm. Guess it's ok. –  Jason Doucette Aug 4 '11 at 5:38
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I know that this is a late answer, but The Good Parts is right actually. (The questioner probably knows this, but for anyone else reading this....); my copy is dated 2008 and this post is 2011. It is printed with a comma.

It's the next bit that baffles me... ;-)

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