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In the following example, is a new variable 'y' created for each iteration through the for..in loop? Or is the variable declaration hoisted to the top of the function, and re-used for each iteration?

function example() {
    var x;
    for(x in obj) {
       var y = obj[x];
    } 
}

Thanks

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's hoisted, since the for loop has no effect on scope.

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I figured, just wanted to make sure. Thanks. – Steve Jul 25 '11 at 22:47

y is the same variable being replaced. to make a new one you would use

function example() {
    var x;
    var y= new Array;
    for(x in obj) {
       y[x] = obj[x];
    } 
}
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I'm afraid that's not right. If you break your loop into two statements: var y and y[x] = obj[x], and then read the value of y between those two statements, you'll find that y still contains the array. Ie, it is not a new undefined variable. – gilly3 Jul 25 '11 at 22:58
    
y is supposed to still contain the obj array item, but now y can index each item from the obj array. i beleive he was asking if y will hold only the last item in the obj array. which is correct, by using y[x] y will contain the same array as obj. – Johnny Craig Jul 25 '11 at 23:04
    
Then why use the var keyword? – gilly3 Jul 25 '11 at 23:15
    
to define y as a new array w3schools.com/js/js_obj_array.asp – Johnny Craig Jul 25 '11 at 23:16
    
my mistake. i didnt realize y was defined already when i copied his code var y[x] = obj[x]; – Johnny Craig Jul 25 '11 at 23:18

You can test this for yourself:

var obj = {
  name: "Dan",
  surname: "Tao"
};

var x;
for (x in obj) {
  var y = obj[x];
}
alert(y);

An alert box will appear with the text Tao, indicating that y is accessible outside the scope of the for loop.

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