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I need to be able to print all of the elements in a randomly chosen list without the brackets or commas. I tried to print each element with the '+' operator but it raised an error about not being able to convert the list to a string. Here is my code now:

t1 = ["rock", 80, 1,2,1]
t2 = ["carpet", 75, 2, 2, 1]
t3 = ["lava", 1000, 1, 1, 1]
t4 = ["rock", 90, 2, 1, 1]
Tiles = [t1, t2, t3, t4]
print(random.choice(Tiles)[0] + [1] + [2] + [3] + [4])
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The print function can take multiple arguments. You don't want to try to stick everything together, because they're of different types - just let Python print them out in order.

title = random.choice(Titles)
print(title[0], title[1], title[2], title[3], title[4])

Of course, that's a bit unwieldy, and doesn't really reflect the intent. Fortunately, there is a shortcut that lets us feed all the items of a list as parameters to a function:

title = random.choice(Titles)
print(*title)

Or, since we don't really need that name any more, just:

print(*random.choice(Titles))
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Honestly, I'm surprised and confused by the complexity of the other answers... –  Karl Knechtel Jul 26 '11 at 1:10
    
Well I wanted to try and do it one line. Your method works fine also and it is by far the easiest so I will probably change my program to use your method. Thank you. –  Zizma Jul 26 '11 at 1:31
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This is probably closer to what you want, I think:

print ' '.join(map(unicode, random.choice(Tiles)))
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That raised other errors relating to strings and integers conflicting. –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 23:00
    
@Zizma - you can coerce the values if you want to ... I'll modify the answer a bit. –  g.d.d.c Jul 25 '11 at 23:00
    
' '.join(str(x) for x in random.choice(Tiles)) –  Thomas K Jul 25 '11 at 23:01
    
@g.d.d.c That works on Python 2.x but not 3.x which is what I'm using. :( –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 23:06
    
@eryksun Thank you, that will work too! –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 23:09
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You should save the result of random choice in a variable, then iterate over its members and print in order.

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That would work but do you know of a way to do it all in one line? –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 22:56
    
Why bother making it one line? –  Patrick87 Jul 25 '11 at 22:58
    
I guess I don't need to. Thank you. –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 22:59
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>>> import random
>>> t1 = ["rock", 80, 1,2,1]
>>> t2 = ["carpet", 75, 2, 2, 1]
>>> t3 = ["lava", 1000, 1, 1, 1]
>>> t4 = ["rock", 90, 2, 1, 1]
>>> Tiles = [t1, t2, t3, t4]
>>> print(random.choice(Titles)[0])
"rock"
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That's not at all like what I said that I am trying to do. –  Zizma Jul 25 '11 at 23:08
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The problem is that you have a bunch of elements of different types and want to print them. What you should do is make a string of the data you want and print that.

Something like this:

>>> import random
>>> tiles = [
...     ["rock", 80, 1,2,1],
...     ["carpet", 75, 2, 2, 1],
...     ["lava", 1000, 1, 1, 1],
...     ["rock", 90, 2, 1, 1],
... ]
>>> tile = random.choice(tiles)
>>> print("The random tile is '{0}', with the values {1}, {2}, {3} and {4}".format(*tile))
The random tile is 'rock', with the values 80, 1, 2 and 1

Anything else is pretty much only suitable for debugging. Like:

>>> print(*tile)
rock 80 1 2 1
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print(repr(random.choice(Tiles))[1:-1].replace(',','  '))
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I would really like to understand what is deserving a downvote in my answer. What's the problem in my answer ?? –  eyquem Jul 26 '11 at 6:31
    
Karl Knechtel's answer is better than mine because it perfectly resort to the fact that print() is a function in Python 3. I should have think to this solution , even if I can't test in Python 3 that I have not installed. However, my answer isn't wrong, I think, and I find downvoting it without any explanation is rather weird –  eyquem Jul 26 '11 at 6:43
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