Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Sometimes my APL familiarity gives me algorithmic ideas for problem solving that I re-implement in a language I have - Perl, for example.

So I have processed a text file to create a boolean vector indicating the used fields in a delimited file, and now I want to output the indexes of those used fields, and the names of the used fields. In APL, I would use the compress operator over the vector of field names, and over the iota of the number of fields.

In Perl, I did this:

my @UsedFieldNames = map { $UsedFields[$_] ? $FieldNames[$_] : () } 0 .. $#UsedFields;

and

say join " ", map { $UsedFields[$_] ? $) : () } 0 .. $#UsedFields;

where @UsedFields is an array containing 0 for unused and 1 for used fields.

  1. I don't really like using map with ?:() to simulate compress - is there a better way (my real program does it a third time when simulating a vertical or reduction over the file)?

  2. I don't really like doing the map over the indexes to get the results - is there a better way to compute that? (I guess one optimization would be to compute the used indexes first, then

    @UsedFieldNames = @FieldNames[@UsedIndexes];

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Other ways:

my @UsedFieldNames = map { ( $FieldNames[$_] ) x !!$UsedFields[$_] } 0..$#UsedFields;
my @UsedFieldNames = @FieldNames[ grep $UsedFields[$_], 0..$#UsedFields ];
share|improve this answer
    
I like the grep, but I don't find the first alternative a compelling improvement over ?:() I see a general rule for me to remember, map { x($_) ? $_ : () } y can be replaced with grep x($_), y –  NetMage Jul 25 '11 at 23:52
    
I can't help but think your task would be easier if some of your data were in a hash; which would depend on what else you are doing. –  ysth Jul 26 '11 at 0:07
    
+1 for this nice splice –  Patrick J. S. Jul 26 '11 at 0:28

The approach with grep or map is the right one, and is what APL would have been using behind the scenes. You can hide that in Perl too with a subroutine:

sub compress (\@\@) {
    @{$_[0]}[ grep $_[1][$_] => 0 .. $#{$_[1]} ]
#or use:
#   map {$_[1][$_] ? $_[0][$_] : ()} 0 .. $#{$_[0]}
}

my @source = qw(one two three four);
my @ok     = qw(0   1   0     1   );

my @new = compress @source, @ok;

say "@new"; # two four

If you are working with array references, you have a few other syntactic options, and in this case I might write it as a scalar method for infix application:

my $compress = sub {
    my $src = shift;
    my $ok  = @_ == 1 && ref $_[0] eq 'ARRAY' ? shift : \@_;
    wantarray ?            @$src[ grep $$ok[$_] => 0 .. $#$ok ]
              : sub{\@_}->(@$src[ grep $$ok[$_] => 0 .. $#$ok ])
};

my $source = [qw(one two three four)];
my $ok     = [qw(1   0   1     0   )];

my $new = $source->$compress($ok);

say "@$new"; # one three
say join ' ' => $source->$compress(0, 1, 1, 0); # two three
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.