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This is part of an exercise we did in class, I just can't figure it out...

The required method is the insertBefore(object data) method wherein when a user choose this method it will prompt it to enter a data to be inserted before the reference data(input by user)

An example of how it should run:

// assuming linked list has data 1,2,3 inserted already

Choose Method:
1)Insert Before

choice: 1 // input by user


====Insert Before====
Enter Reference data: 2 // input by user
Enter Data to be inserted: 5 // input by user

supposed output: 1,5,2,3

Here's my code for this exercise: (This is inside a class called LinkList with variables

protected int end;
protected Node start;

and an inner class called Node)

private class Node
{
    public char data;
    public Node next;
    public Node(char data)
    {
        this.data = data;
    }
}


public void insertBef(char ref,char data)
{
    Node temp = new Node(data);
    Node current = start;

    if(end!=0)
    {
        for(int i = 1; i<end; i++)
        {
            if(current == start)
            {
                Node newNode = start;
                newNode.data = current.data;
                newNode.next = temp;
                current = current.next;
            }
            else if(current.data == ref)
            {
                Node newNode = current;
                newNode.data = current.data;
                newNode.next = temp;
                current = current.next;
            }
        }
        end++;

    }
    else
    {
        temp.next = start;
        start = temp;
    }
    end++;
}

But when I run my code it ouputs 3,5, not 1,5,2,3! I can't see where I might have gone wrong...

Can someone please tell me where the mistake is, and explain how I might fix it?

I understand that to be able to insert before a reference value you should:

  • Make a new node for the new data
  • Make a temporary node for the reference value and link
  • Make the link of the data before the reference value point to the new node and make the link of the new node point to the temporary node

I just can't seem to figure out how to implement it in Java code...

share|improve this question
    
Does end signify the number of nodes in the list? I notice that end is being incremented twice when it isn't 0 –  Paul Bellora Jul 26 '11 at 0:50
    
Please post an SSCCE. –  Charles Goodwin Jul 26 '11 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First things first: for loops are generally a bad idea with linked lists. while loops are much better; you can do something like while(next != null).

Looking at your code, you seem to have a few problems.

Your for loop is overly complicated, and doesn't seem to make a lot of sense. Here's how your loop should look:

  1. Get head node
  2. Begin looping through the list, checking the next node's value as you go
  3. Once you find that the next node's value is the one you're looking for, creating a new node.
  4. Insert the new node by setting its Next value to be equal to the current node's Next value, then set the current node's next value to be the new node.
  5. Return from the function.

Your middle bullet point is actually unnecessary, and I have no idea what you use end for. Regardless, you seem to have the basic principle down, so I won't feel like I'm spoiling you by posting code.

Now, I'm not sure what your start is. Does it hold a value, or is it a dedicated head node? I'd vote for a dedicated head node, I generally find it easier to work with because you don't need to add code for a special case where the number should come before the head. So your start node should be "empty"; the value it holds is ignored, the only thing it's used for is to keep a pointer to the first legit node in the list. If you do this, the insertBef method becomes incredibly simple. NOTE: untested code to follow.

public void insertBef(char ref, char data)
{
    Node current = start;

    while( current.next != null )
    {
        if( current.next.value == ref )
        {
            Node n = new Node(data);
            n.next = current.next;
            current.next = n;
            return;
        }

        current = current.next;
    }
}

Please don't just copy the code. If you have questions, post them and I'll do my best to answer.

share|improve this answer
    
im sorry for the really late reply...uhm i seem to get your point and understood Linked List better.. thank you. sometimes i really tend to overlook some of the things... still.. Thank you again! :) –  Kevin Aug 1 '11 at 4:47
    
@Mannimarco, Why do you say "for loops are generally bad idea with linked lists"? Your while can be written as a for like so: for (Node current = start; current.next != null; current = current.next) {...}. I'm trying to understand why the rewritten form is a "bad idea". –  user46874 Jul 7 '12 at 8:41

When programming, if it seems hard, you're probably going about it the wrong way...

You only need one line of code to accomplish the task!

list.add(list.indexOf(reference), data);

Here's this line wrapped as an insertBefore method:

public static void insertBefore(List<Integer> list, int reference, int data) {
    list.add(list.indexOf(reference), data);
}

Here's a test using your example:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>(Arrays.asList(1, 2, 3));
    insertBefore(list, 2, 5);
    System.out.println(list);
}

Output:

[1, 5, 2, 3]

Note: This code will throw an exception if the reference element is not found.
I'll leave it to you to plug that hole.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think the OP need to implement a List not using one. –  user802421 Jul 26 '11 at 1:01

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