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I'm having trouble solving a problem with iterative SQL queries (which I need to do away with) and I'm trying to work out an alternative.

(Also; unfortunately, AJAX is not really suitable)

Given I have the following tables for location data:

Country
    country_id
    name

State
    state_id
    country_id
    name

City
    city_id
    state_id
    name

Now, I'm trying to pull all of the data, however it's actually quite tiny (147 cities, split between 64 states, split between 2 countries) however it's taking forever because I'm iteratively looping:

// this is pseudo-code, but it gets the point across

$countries = getCountries();
foreach($countries as &$country){
    $country['states'] = $states = getStates($country['country_id']);
    foreach($states as &$state){
        $state['cities'] = getCities($state['state_id']);
    }
}

The reason I'm going this way, is because my final result set needs to be in the form:

$countries = array(
    array(
        'name' => 'country_name',
        'id' => 'country_id',
        'states' => array(
            array(
                'name' => 'state_name',
                'id' => 'state_id',
                'cities' => array(
                    array(
                        'name' => 'city_name',
                        'id' => 'city_id',
                    ),
                    // ... more cities
                ),
            ),
            // ... more states
        ),
    ),
    // ... more countries
);

I can't seem to wrap my head around a faster approach. What alternatives exist to querying for hierarchical data?


Revised:

    $sql = "SELECT
                `dbc_country`.`name` as `country_name`,
                `dbc_state`.`name` as `state_name`,
                `city_id`,
                `dbc_city`.`name` as `city_name`,
                `latitude`,
                `longitude`
            FROM
                `dbc_city`
                    INNER JOIN
                `dbc_state` ON `dbc_city`.`state_id` = `dbc_state`.`state_id`
                    INNER JOIN
                `dbc_country` ON `dbc_state`.`country_id` = `dbc_country`.`country_id`";
    $locations = array();
    foreach($datasource->fetchSet($sql) as $row){
        $locations[$row['country_name']][$row['state_name']][] = array(
            $row['city_id'],
            $row['city_name'],
            $row['latitude'],
            $row['longitude'],
        );
    }

(I also removed the id values of states/countries, since they were uselessly taking up space)

share|improve this question
    
Have you tried logarithms? – Jon Martin Jul 26 '11 at 1:16
    
@Jon Martin - No, and I wouldn't know in what manner I would implement logarithmic calculations to my advantage (if that's even what you mean, my mathematics skills are poorer than I desire them to be :'() – Northborn Design Jul 26 '11 at 1:20
up vote 3 down vote accepted

it would be much faster to do joins in the sql

then iterate over the single (larger) result set.

share|improve this answer
    
yep - The O.P doesn't say what is the factor that is causing the performance issues - but I'd imagine it would be the number of queries being generated. Two levels of loops with sql queries inside is a world of pain. – calumbrodie Jul 26 '11 at 1:20
    
@kissmyface - Precisely, profiled at over 4.2 seconds for the queries. (somewhat arbitrary yes, but its over 80% of the otherwise already complicated request) – Northborn Design Jul 26 '11 at 1:22
    
4 seconds to get data from 150 records is way too slow. Try with 1 JOINing query (and worry about perforamnce if/when your tables grow too much). – ypercubeᵀᴹ Jul 26 '11 at 1:31
    
Thanks @Randy - Posted my revised version in an edit; so much faster, the WebGrind profile shows it as a veritable blip in terms of process cost. – Northborn Design Jul 26 '11 at 1:48
    
nice - much better looking. – Randy Jul 26 '11 at 11:54

I would either use one query:

SELECT co.name AS CountryName
     , st.name AS StateName
     , ci.name AS CityName
FROM Country AS co
  LEFT JOIN State AS st
    ON st.country_id = co.country_id
  LEFT JOIN City AS ci
    ON ci.state_id = st.state_id
ORDER BY CountryName
       , StateName
       , CityName

or three (if you have lots of records and you are worried of sending "United States of America" hundreds of thousands of times over the connection from MySQL to application code):

--- **GetCountries**
SELECT co.country_id
     , co.name AS CountryName
FROM Country AS co
ORDER BY CountryName

--- **GetStates**
SELECT co.country_id
     , st.state_id
     , st.name AS StateName
FROM Country AS co
  JOIN State AS st
    ON st.country_id = co.country_id
ORDER BY CountryName
       , StateName

--- **GetCities**
SELECT co.country_id
     , st.state_id
     , ci.city_id
     , ci.name AS CityName
FROM Country AS co
  JOIN State AS st
    ON st.country_id = co.country_id
  JOIN City AS ci
    ON ci.state_id = st.state_id
ORDER BY CountryName
       , StateName
       , CityName
share|improve this answer

The common approach to database design emphasizes doing as much work as possible, with as few queries as possible. Its look right. But quoting this thread title, “Query Efficiency”, that approach doesn’t apply as much to MySQL. FYI, MySQL was designed to handle connecting and disconnecting very efficiently and to respond to small and simple queries very quickly, so as long you immediate freeing memmory on your sequenced queries, i think its okay. Furthermore, if your record growing (into 100000 records for example), then maybe you will think twice to use JOIN statement.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with your opening statement, but not our conclusion about it being O.K to connect/disconnect very often. When writing web applications it's better (IMO) to use as few queries as possible (within reason - you'd have to balance this against the time it takes to execute queries). In the example the O.P gives, as long as the table are properly indexed there is no reason that one query to retrieve all data would be problematic. Implementing a query cache would further improve the speed of data retrieval. – calumbrodie Jul 26 '11 at 1:27
    
Did you know, that MySQL can run more than 50,000 simple queries per second on commodity server hardware? – toopay Jul 26 '11 at 1:31
    
that approach still does apply to mysql. the OP problem shows why this is so important. – Randy Jul 26 '11 at 1:32
    
Query caching, should be your last choice on your long database performance tunning agendas. Because if you were used memcached, and still get poor performance, than you're out of luck.Normalisation, indexing, and maximize query is just to mention, what you should check before that. And in this section, you could found an option : Complex Queries versus Many Queries, which no need to i defend :). Do some benchmark, and the number will talk for itself. – toopay Jul 26 '11 at 1:39
1  
The answer that is marked correct speaks for itself. In this instance (and many others that I have experience of IRL) it is better to refactor loops in code which contain queries to one query which returns a larger result set which can then be iterated. – calumbrodie Jul 26 '11 at 7:58

What if your data looked like this instead?

Table: country 
iso_country_code        country_name
--
CA                      Canada
US                      United States of America

Table: state
iso_country_code    state_abbr    state_name
--
US                  NE            Nebraska
CA                  NB            New Brunswick

Table: city
iso_country_code    state_abbr    city_name
--
US                  NE            Lincoln
US                  NE            Arapahoe
CA                  NB            Dalhousie
CA                  NB            Miramichi

Would you be able to use the codes and abbreviations instead of the full names?

Even if you can't, you can get all the necessary rows with a single SELECT statement, then walk the rows to populate your array. (You can do that with ID numbers, too, but with ID numbers, you always have to do the joins. With codes and abbreviations, you can often satisfy your users with just the code or abbreviation.)

share|improve this answer

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