Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is in short that following a server restart (my own local Tomcat), the Spring Security principal object is repopulated with every field (username, password, email, userType, etc) except the user ID field.

I have the following User object which implements Spring's UserDetails object and also extends my own base object class:

public class User extends BaseDomainObject implements UserDetails {
    private String username;
    private String emailAddress;
    private String password;
    // ... etc ... /
}

(FYI, the User class has a constructor that accepts all fields except the ID (which is sneakily injected by hibernate). There are no setters on this object. Not sure if that's important.)

The user ID field lives in the BaseDomainObject:

class BaseDomainObject {
    protected Long id;
    public Long getId() {
        return id;
    }
}

Following a successful login, the principal is populated with the above user details (including the ID) and everything is happy. This is confirmed by the following log output (which includes a toString representation of the User class above in the form User[id,username,emailAddress]):

2011-07-26 11:50:25,188 DEBUG [org.springframework.security.web.context.HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository] - Obtained a valid SecurityContext from SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT: 'org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextImpl@5e8fac5a: Authentication: org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken@5e8fac5a: Principal: User[1,test,test@test.com]; Credentials: [PROTECTED]; Authenticated: true; Details: org.springframework.security.web.authentication.WebAuthenticationDetails@255f8: RemoteIpAddress: 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1%0; SessionId: 450FFF87C04098ECC58C2E0829D21D69; Granted Authorities: ROLE_USER, ROLE_CUSTOMER'

However, following a server restart, the same log output looks like this:

2011-07-26 11:52:28,355 DEBUG [org.springframework.security.web.context.HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository] - Obtained a valid SecurityContext from SPRING_SECURITY_CONTEXT: 'org.springframework.security.core.context.SecurityContextImpl@729a68c9: Authentication: org.springframework.security.authentication.UsernamePasswordAuthenticationToken@729a68c9: Principal: User[null,test,test@test.com]; Credentials: [PROTECTED]; Authenticated: true; Details: org.springframework.security.web.authentication.WebAuthenticationDetails@255f8: RemoteIpAddress: 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1%0; SessionId: 450FFF87C04098ECC58C2E0829D21D69; Granted Authorities: ROLE_USER, ROLE_CUSTOMER'

I should reiterate that there are other fields on the User class (not in the base class) that are also populated successfully. Basically everything except ID.

Does Spring security invoke the User constructor when setting fields? Admittedly I never really thought about "how" Spring repopulates the rest of the fields - perhaps that's my issue? I really didn't want to expose the ID field with a setter / in the constructor. In fact, adding ID to the constructor doesn't do anything.

Thanks for any assistance.

share|improve this question
    
Can you paste your implementation of your custom userDetailService and where you call it in the security-context xml? –  plus- Jul 26 '11 at 2:39
    
shouldn't both these classes implement Serializable? If you want to understand how the domain object is repopulated, why don't you set a breakpoint and attach a debugger? –  matt b Jul 26 '11 at 2:51
1  
groan You're right matt b - UserDetails extends Serializable however BaseDomainObject does not. Adding Serializable fixes the issue. If you'd like to answer below I can accept your answer? –  Ben J Jul 26 '11 at 2:55
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would suggest making sure that both of your domain objects implements Serializable, otherwise the servlet container likely may choose to not serialize them to disk (which is how your session data is repopulated after a restart - Tomcat is reading session data serialized to a file).

share|improve this answer
3  
A few more details: check out the SecurityContextPersistenceFilter class, which defines how the SecurityContextHolder is populated. If you're using the HttpSessionSecurityContextRepository, then the user's security context (the thing assigned by Spring upon successful authentication) is stored in the HTTP session. And if your servlet container persists sessions and restores them after restart, then you should check there. –  jtoberon Jul 26 '11 at 3:10
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.