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I am looking for the best way (fast and elegant) to get a random boolean in python (flip a coin).

For the moment I am using random.randint(0, 1) or random.getrandbits(1).

Are there better choices that I am not aware of?

Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Adam's answer is quite fast, but I found that random.getrandbits(1) to be quite a lot faster. If you really want a boolean instead of a long then

bool(random.getrandbits(1))

is still about twice as fast as random.choice([True, False])

If utmost speed isn't to priority then random.choice definitely reads better

$ python -m timeit -s "import random" "random.choice([True, False])"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.904 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "import random" "random.choice((True, False))" 
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.846 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "import random" "random.getrandbits(1)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.286 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "import random" "bool(random.getrandbits(1))"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.441 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "import random" "not random.getrandbits(1)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.308 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "from random import getrandbits" "not getrandbits(1)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.262 usec per loop  # not takes about 20us of this

Added this one after seeing @Pavel's answer

$ python -m timeit -s "from random import random" "random() < 0.5"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.115 usec per loop
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3  
If we're all about performance, not not random.getrandbits(1)) is faster than bool ;) –  Michał Bentkowski Jul 26 '11 at 9:38
11  
@Michal, a single not works just as well in this case –  gnibbler Jul 26 '11 at 10:33
    
Nice ! Thanks ! –  Xavier V. Jul 26 '11 at 13:21
5  
You likely don't even need to cast to a boolean at all, since 0/1 have the proper truth values. –  Adam Vandenberg Jul 26 '11 at 16:46
1  
You could speed it up further by doing from random import getrandbits to avoid the attribute lookup. :-) –  kindall Jul 26 '11 at 23:07
random.choice([True, False])

would also work.

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Found a faster method:

$ python -m timeit -s "from random import getrandbits" "not getrandbits(1)"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.222 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "from random import random" "True if random() > 0.5 else False"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0786 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit -s "from random import random" "random() > 0.5"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0579 usec per loop
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random() > 0.5 already evaluates to a bool which is even faster! –  gnibbler Mar 8 at 9:15
    
You're right! It's much faster :) I've updated the answer. –  Pavel Radchenko Mar 13 at 21:03
2  
random() >= 0.5, otherwise you will be a tiny bit biased towards False. –  Simon Lindholm Mar 17 at 22:42

If you want to generate a number of random booleans you could use numpy's random module. From the documentation

np.random.randint(2, size=10)

will return 10 random uniform integers in the open interval [0,2). The size keyword specifies the number of values to generate.

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I like

 np.random.rand() > .5
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