Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been looking at this for several months and so far this is the best I have come up with.

The structure (render outside of EDT) is not up for debate, as our application operates this way and will not be rewritten. The application has a layout model and a scripting model which are integrated and drive rendering, so the render must be performed outside of the AWT paint model.

What I am trying to arrive at is the optimal and reliable way to perform custom rendering.

The following SSCCE works fairly well for us. However, during frame resizes, it has 2 drawbacks:

  • There is occasional flicker, especially on rapid resizes
  • The "smooth resize" hack which is to invoke resize (via checkSize here) from a paint() call only works well for expansions. When reducing the frame it usually does not render until the mouse button is released
  • Also, but not so evident here, it does throw occasional IllegalStateExceptions - is it OK to simply catch/ignore these?

Also useful is input on whether this is the optimal approach for a custom render path that takes place outside of the EDT. I have tried most, and done fairly extensive research. This combination (backbuffer image, double buffer strategy) seems to work the best.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Frame;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Insets;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.awt.event.ComponentEvent;
import java.awt.event.ComponentListener;
import java.awt.event.MouseEvent;
import java.awt.event.MouseMotionListener;
import java.awt.image.BufferStrategy;

public class SmoothResize extends Frame implements ComponentListener, MouseMotionListener {

    public SmoothResize() {
        addComponentListener(this);
        addMouseMotionListener(this);
    }

    private boolean sizeChanged = false;
    private Dimension old = new Dimension(0, 0);
    private synchronized void checkSize(String source) {
        int width = getWidth();
        int height = getHeight();
        if (old.width == width && old.height == height)
            return;
        sizeChanged = true;
        String type =
            (old.width > width && old.height > height) ? "shrink" :
                (old.width < width && old.height < height) ? "expand" : "resize";
        System.out.println(source + " reports " + type + ": "+getWidth()+", "+getHeight());
        old.setSize(width, height);
    }

    public void componentResized(ComponentEvent arg0) { checkSize("componentResized"); }
    public void mouseMoved(MouseEvent e) { checkSize("mouseMoved"); }
    public void paint(Graphics g) { checkSize("paint"); }
    public void update(Graphics g) { paint(g); }

    public void addNotify() {
        super.addNotify();
        createBufferStrategy(2);
    }

    private synchronized void render() {
        BufferStrategy strategy = getBufferStrategy();
        if (strategy==null || !sizeChanged) return;
        sizeChanged = false;
        // Render single frame
        do {
            // The following loop ensures that the contents of the drawing buffer
            // are consistent in case the underlying surface was recreated
            do {
                System.out.println("render");
                Graphics draw = strategy.getDrawGraphics();
                Insets i = getInsets();
                int w = getWidth()-i.left-i.right;
                int h = getHeight()-i.top-i.bottom;
                draw.setColor(Color.YELLOW);
                draw.fillRect(i.left, i.top+(h/2), w/2, h/2);
                draw.fillRect(i.left+(w/2), i.top, w/2, h/2);
                draw.setColor(Color.BLACK);
                draw.fillRect(i.left, i.top, w/2, h/2);
                draw.fillRect(i.left+(w/2), i.top+(h/2), w/2, h/2);
                draw.dispose();

                // Repeat the rendering if the drawing buffer contents 
                // were restored
            } while (strategy.contentsRestored());

            // Display the buffer
            strategy.show();

            // Repeat the rendering if the drawing buffer was lost
        } while (strategy.contentsLost());
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().setDynamicLayout(true);
        System.setProperty("sun.awt.noerasebackground", "true");
        SmoothResize srtest = new SmoothResize();
        //srtest.setIgnoreRepaint(true);
        srtest.setSize(100, 100);
        srtest.setVisible(true);
        while (true) {
            srtest.render();
        }
    }

    public void componentHidden(ComponentEvent arg0) { }
    public void componentMoved(ComponentEvent arg0) { }
    public void componentShown(ComponentEvent arg0) { }

    public void mouseDragged(MouseEvent e) { }
}
share|improve this question
    
+1 for sscce; also consider using the corresponding adapters. –  trashgod Jul 26 '11 at 3:06
    
@trashgod: which adapters specifically and I was unaware there was any benefit to using an adapter vs using a listener - or is it a coding practise thing? –  Charles Goodwin Jul 26 '11 at 9:50
    
ComponentListener -> ComponentAdapter, etc. Less clutter from empty implementations. –  trashgod Jul 26 '11 at 15:21
    
@trashgod: there is no multiple inheritance in Java, so would have to use anonymous classes. As it is, our implementation uses those empty implementations so it was derived from something functional. :) –  Charles Goodwin Jul 26 '11 at 15:40
    
That makes sense, but the adapters are abstract; composition with a named subtype is a common approach. It's one way to avoid leaking this. –  trashgod Jul 26 '11 at 16:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is code that renders with an outside Thread doing all the work. It does this by being able to render anything that implements the Renderable interface. I have tested this with both Swing and AWT (JFrame and Frame) and it works with no flickering. Note, it does flicker if you implement onto a JRootPane and set that pane as the JFrame's root pane. This has to do with how the component is buffered, and could be fixed if that is how you want to use this.

If this is still not what you were looking for, just say and I'll give it another go. This is actually fun, as it has been awhile since I've done any Java GUI work.

Anyways, here you go:

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Frame;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import javax.swing.JFrame;

public class SmoothResize extends Frame implements Renderable {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().setDynamicLayout(true);
        System.setProperty("sun.awt.noerasebackground", "true");
        SmoothResize srtest = new SmoothResize();
        RenderThread renderThread = new RenderThread(srtest);
        renderThread.start();
        srtest.setSize(100, 100);
        srtest.setVisible(true);
    }

    public SmoothResize() {
    }

    public void addNotify() {
        super.addNotify();
        createBufferStrategy(2);
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getSize() {
        return new Dimension(getWidth(), getHeight());
    }

    @Override
    public Graphics acquireGraphics() {
        return this.getGraphics();
    }
}

class RenderThread extends Thread {

    Renderable target;
    Dimension last_size = new Dimension(Integer.MAX_VALUE, Integer.MAX_VALUE);

    public RenderThread(Renderable d) {
        if (d == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException("Drawable target cannot be null.");
        }
        target = d;

    }

    @Override
    public void run() {
        while (true) {
            render(false);
        }
    }

    private synchronized void render(boolean force) {
        Dimension size;
        do {
            size = target.getSize();
            if (size == null) {
                return;
            }

            Graphics draw = target.acquireGraphics();
            if (draw == null) {
                return;
            }
            draw.setPaintMode();
            int w = (int) (((double) (size.width)) / 2 + 0.5);
            int h = (int) (((double) (size.height)) / 2 + 0.5);
            draw.setColor(Color.YELLOW);
            draw.fillRect(0, h, w, h);
            draw.fillRect(w, 0, w, h);
            draw.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            draw.fillRect(0, 0, w, h);
            draw.fillRect(w, h, w, h);
            draw.dispose();
            // Repeat the rendering if the target changed size
        } while (!size.equals(target.getSize()));
    }
}

interface Renderable {

    public Graphics acquireGraphics();

    public Dimension getSize();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That looks pretty neat. I shall try it out ASAP (which unfortunately may be Monday if I can't get to it tonight). A quick question though - the Renderable interface is just something locally defined, right? (No java.awt.Renderable or similar seems to exist.) –  Charles Goodwin Aug 2 '11 at 16:09
    
I won't be using a rootpane, as the custom UI we use takes over everything so it isn't necessary AFAICT. –  Charles Goodwin Aug 2 '11 at 16:13
1  
The Renderable interface is defined as an inner class at the bottom of the file. It seemed to me using an interface was the best way to do it, as it provided the most flexibility to your implementation. –  Josh Aug 2 '11 at 16:53
    
You did specify that No awt components were going to be added to the frame, correct? –  Josh Aug 2 '11 at 17:03
    
Correct - unless required to implement better rendering. :-) –  Charles Goodwin Aug 2 '11 at 17:04

This answer is left here for reference, but is not the correct answer because it renders inside the EDT thread.

Here is a working fix! :D Basically the problem is that the ComponentResized is not appropriately called until the mouse is released after a shrink. Also, because the paint and checkSize methods are synchronized, they can exclude each other in rare instances. The fix is to override the validate method in the Frame class. This method is always called if the Frame changes state, including shrinks and growths. So we simply have to check the size in the validate and we can actually completely forget about using a ComponentResized method at all.

So, here is working code that compiles as is. I changed some of the variable names to improve my personal readability.

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.Insets;
import java.awt.Toolkit;
import java.awt.image.BufferStrategy;
import java.awt.Frame;

public class SmoothResize extends Frame {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().setDynamicLayout(true);
    System.setProperty("sun.awt.noerasebackground", "true");
    SmoothResize srtest = new SmoothResize();
    //srtest.setIgnoreRepaint(true);
    srtest.setSize(100, 100);
    srtest.setVisible(true);
}

public SmoothResize() {
    render();
}

private Dimension old_size = new Dimension(0, 0);
private Dimension new_size = new Dimension(0, 0);

public void validate() {
    super.validate();
    new_size.width = getWidth();
    new_size.height = getHeight();
    if (old_size.equals(new_size)) {
        return;
    } else {
        render();
    }
}

public void paint(Graphics g) {
    validate();
}

public void update(Graphics g) {
    paint(g);
}

public void addNotify() {
    super.addNotify();
    createBufferStrategy(2);
}

protected synchronized void render() {
    BufferStrategy strategy = getBufferStrategy();
    if (strategy == null) {
        return;
    }
    // Render single frame
    do {
        // The following loop ensures that the contents of the drawing buffer
        // are consistent in case the underlying surface was recreated
        do {
            Graphics draw = strategy.getDrawGraphics();
            Insets i = getInsets();
            int w = (int)(((double)(getWidth() - i.left - i.right))/2+0.5);
            int h = (int)(((double)(getHeight() - i.top - i.bottom))/2+0.5);
            draw.setColor(Color.YELLOW);
            draw.fillRect(i.left, i.top + h, w,h);
            draw.fillRect(i.left + w, i.top, w,h);
            draw.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            draw.fillRect(i.left, i.top, w, h);
            draw.fillRect(i.left + w, i.top + h, w,h);
            draw.dispose();

            // Repeat the rendering if the drawing buffer contents 
            // were restored
        } while (strategy.contentsRestored());

        // Display the buffer
        strategy.show();

        // Repeat the rendering if the drawing buffer was lost
    } while (strategy.contentsLost());
   }

  }

I hope that works for you!

Also, last second edit, I changed the logical ternary operation for the selection of your shrink or expand String. The last comparison was unnecessary because for the comparison in question, the values can be greater than, less than or equal to each other. There is not another possibility that would not generate a NullPointerException.

The stricken text is no longer relevant as I have completely removed that entire method. I indicate the other changes I've made to the original post as comments.

share|improve this answer
    
Also, I'm not sure if this code was a grab from an actual in production code, but it might be advantageous to replace a method like checkSize(String s) with an ActionListener that listens to the frame itself. This would be more inline with the Java AWT Event model, and would provide a more consistent codebase. –  Josh Aug 1 '11 at 0:58
    
I have edited the original post again. The extra MouseListener code was removed, as it served no purpose related to the question at hand. I also fixed the window flicker issue. That was do to implicit type conversion. When you divided the int of the window's width and height by two in the render method, it initially converted them to doubles to hold the extra .5 it would get dividing odd numbers. For instance, the int window size 3 becomes 1.5 as a double. Putting a double value to an int variable converts through truncation, cutting off the .5, and leaving a little white line in the render. –  Josh Aug 1 '11 at 8:10
    
And may I recommend that you utilize Swing components, like JFrame, instead of the outdated AWT classes? –  Josh Aug 1 '11 at 8:17
    
Your code didn't compile, there's an extra } ;-), but after removing that it works!! Now I wonder what the difference is between using Swing and AWT for this, as there are no components added to the Frame/JFrame? I'll post a follow up question for that, I think. –  Charles Goodwin Aug 1 '11 at 10:33
    
In retrospect I should have not given the +100 yet as this implementation does paint in the EDT which kinda breaks the model. It is synchronized, so it may work in the outside-EDT render model, and I'll check that and get back to you. –  Charles Goodwin Aug 1 '11 at 10:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.