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The following page displays five buttons, clicking each button gets alert '5'. I want when I click the first button, I get alert '1', the second button '2' ...etc.

<!doctype html>
<html>
    <head>
        <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <div id="nums"></div>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
            for(var i in nums){
                var num = nums[i];
                var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(function(){alert(num);});
                $('#nums').append(btn);
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>
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Thank you all for the excellent answers! I clicked '+1' for all of the correct answers. But I can only accept one answer. Really sorry for that. –  Peter Long Jul 26 '11 at 4:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The event handler functions you're creating in the loop have an enduring reference to the variables in scope where they're created, not a copy of those variables as of when the function was created. This is how closures work (more: Closures are not complicated). So all of your handler functions refer to the same num variable, and they refer to it as of when the click event occurs. Since at that point it's 5 (the last value it was ever assigned), you end up with all of them alerting 5.

If you want the event handler to refer to num as of when the handler was created, you have to have the handler close over something that won't change. The usual way is to have a function that builds your handler function, and have the handler function close over an argument to that builder function:

var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
for(var i in nums){
    var num = nums[i];
    var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(buildHandler(num));
    $('#nums').append(btn);
}

function buildHandler(val) {
    return function(){alert(val);};
}

As you can see, we call buildHandler when hooking the click event and pass its return value into click. buildHandler creates and returns a function that closes over val, the argument we pass to it. Since val is a copy of the number we want it to alert, and nothing ever changes val, the functions perform as desired.


Off-topic 1: You're creating a lot of global variables in that code. The global namespace is already very crowded, I recommend avoiding creating more globals whenever you can avoid it. I'd wrap that code in a function so that the varibles are all local to that function:

<script>
    (function() {
        var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
        for(var i in nums){
            var num = nums[i];
            var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(buildHandler(num));
            $('#nums').append(btn);
        }

        function buildHandler(val) {
            return function(){alert(val);};
        }
    })();
</script>

It does the same thing (we define the function, then call it immediately), but without creating global i, num, nums, and btn variables.


Off-topic 2: You've used for..in with an array without doing any checks to make sure you're only dealing with array indexes. for..in does not loop through array indexes; it loops through object property names. Writing for..in loops as though they looped through array indexes will bite you at some stage. Just use a normal for loop or do the necessary checks or use jQuery's each function. More: Myths and realities of for..in

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+1 for a good explanation and good off-topic points. –  FishBasketGordo Jul 26 '11 at 3:46
    
+1 for the for..in description and linked article. (I'd say +2 to reward you for having written the linked article, but SO won't let me do +2.) –  nnnnnn Jul 26 '11 at 3:50
    
+1 for the detailed explanation. I thought the problem could be resolved in another way: 1. deep clone num. alert(num.deep_clone()); but I didn't finish the experiment. I thought the solution should work, at least in other languages such as C# and python. –  Peter Long Jul 26 '11 at 3:55
    
@Peter: You'd just be cloning the num variable as of when the click fires, which isn't going to change anything (you'd be cloning the value 5). You have to make a copy of the value earlier, during the loop creating handlers, which is exactly what we're doing with buildHandler. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 26 '11 at 4:04

JavaScript only has function scope, so in your example there is only one num, which keeps being modified, and by the time the click event is invoked, it equals five. To get around this, you have to create the right closure with a new function scope, like this:

var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
var createClick = function (num) { return function() { alert(num); }; };
for(var i in nums){
    var num = nums[i];
    var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(createClick(num));
    $('#nums').append(btn);
}  
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Do you mean, in order to pass by value, I have to create a closure? Why could the closure enable passing by value? Any other solutions? –  Peter Long Jul 26 '11 at 3:26
    
This is a common problem. You are already creating a closure in your original example, but num refers to the var num in the outer scope, and when you modify num in the outer scope in the line var num = nums[i];, you're modifying the num that your closure refers to. Thus, it always alerts 5. By using a helper function that returns a function, your creating a closure around num (the argument to createClick), which doesn't get modified. There are variations to this solution, but they are all essentially the same. JavaScript only has function scope. –  FishBasketGordo Jul 26 '11 at 3:36
    
@Peter: This has nothing to do with passing by value. (And JavaScript is entirely pass-by-value; there is no pass-by-reference in JavaScript at all.) –  T.J. Crowder Jul 26 '11 at 3:50

Change this line:

var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(function(){alert($(this).text()});
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smart answer. but this is a workaround rather than a solution. text() happens to be what we want to alert(); Suppose that the text() has nothing to do with what we want to alert, the the workaround does not work. –  Peter Long Jul 26 '11 at 3:40
    
Right, but that wasn't the question. –  Jeff Sherlock Jul 26 '11 at 15:41

All of the click handlers you create refer back to the same global variable num, which will be 5 after the loop has run and still five at the point when you actually do click to trigger the handler and display the alert.

Two ways to get around that are as follows:

(1) Given you're already setting the number as the text of the button, use that within the handler like this:

// jQuery will set 'this' for you when it calls your click handler
[...].click(function(){ alert($(this).text()); });

(2) Create a closure so that the individual values of num are retained for each handler:

[...].click((function(closureNum){
                return function(){ alert(closureNum); }
             })(num));

EDIT: Just saw the other answers. For a better variation on my second option I would recommend doing what T.J. and FishBasketGordo did and have a separate handler building function rather than doing it inline like I did. Either should work, but the separate handler builder should be more efficient (and, arguably, easier to read).

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Try this

<script type="text/javascript">
            var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
            for(var i in nums){
                var num = nums[i];
                var btn=$('<button></button>').text(num).click(function(){alert(nums[i]);});
                $('#nums').append(btn);
            }
        </script>
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This won't work for the same reason the original code didn't work: after the loop has run, and by the time the handler is actually called, i will be 4. –  nnnnnn Jul 26 '11 at 3:54

This is simpler:

var nums = [1,2,3,4,5];
$.each(nums, function(index, value){
    var btn=$('<button></button>').text(value).click(function(){alert(value);});
    $('#nums').append(btn);
});

As you already have jquery in your page, why not use $.each()?

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