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I'm trying to write a simple database wrapper class. I've written a method like so:

public function get_objects($sql, $class_name = null) {
    $result = mysql_query( $sql, $this->connection );
    $objs = array();
    if( $result ) {
        while ($obj = mysql_fetch_object($result, $class_name)) {
            $objs[] = $obj;
        }
        mysql_free_result($result);
    }
    return $objs;
}

If I don't specify $class_name when calling this method the call to mysql_fetch_object fails with the following error:

PHP Fatal error:  Class '' not found in ...

The problem is I don't want it to use a class_name. I just want it to perform the default behavior as if I hadn't specified a class_name.

Why is this failing?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The default isn't null. The default is stdClass (from the docs):

The name of the class to instantiate, set the properties of and return. If not specified, a stdClass object is returned.

If you want to keep the same default, you'll need to have this as your method signature:

 public function get_objects($sql, $class_name = "stdClass") {
     // continue as normal.
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i think the classname should be quoted. –  prodigitalson Jul 26 '11 at 3:38
    
@prodigitalson You're right. Answer edited. –  cwallenpoole Jul 26 '11 at 3:42
    
What will happen if he sends in a falsy second parameter? –  Explosion Pills Jul 26 '11 at 4:30
    
What happens if he sends mysql_fetch_object($result, "invalid string")? It fails and outputs an error. –  cwallenpoole Jul 26 '11 at 4:39

If you don't want to specify a specific class, then why are you even using the class_name argument?

If you absolutely must use it, this should work

if ( $result ) {
   $class_name = $class_name ? $class_name : 'stdClass';
   ...
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Because he wants "passthru" form his custom function so he needs to have a default... –  prodigitalson Jul 26 '11 at 3:37

Maybe because it is expecting a string and you give it null. I would do an if check to see if $class_name!=null.

public function get_objects($sql, $class_name = null) {
    $result = mysql_query( $sql, $this->connection );
    $objs = array();
    if( $result ) {
        if ($class_name){
            while ($obj = mysql_fetch_object($result, $class_name)) {
                $objs[] = $obj;
            }
        }else{
            while ($obj = mysql_fetch_object($result)) {
                $objs[] = $obj;
            }
        }
        mysql_free_result($result);
    }
    return $objs;
}
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