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I'm using the third party jsonp library for jquery. In the call to it, you can set cache to true.

However, upon checking in a HTTP sniffer, it appears that all requests are still being sent to the server..

This with the picasa, flickr, and youtube API.

What could be causing this behavior? It does not appear to be browser-specific as I have tested it in multiple browsers and all behave the same (not caching).

The URLs called don't change from one request to the other and the call looks like this:

        $.jsonp({
            url: url,
            cache: true,
            async: false,
            dataType: 'jsonp',
            data: $.extend({ url: options.dataUrl, method: lookupData.method }, fixedOptions),
            callbackParameter: "jsoncallback",
            success: function(data)
            {
                $.extend(datasourceOptions, lookupData.onData(data));
                getData();
            }
        });

The only "weird" thing about my setup is that the script that will call the .jsonp is included via a .ajax call itself.. Could that be the issue here? Sounds far fetched but...

Thanks, Wesley

Edit: Ok, 3 out of the 4 have Expires headers set..

However, the fourth does not and only has these:

Cache-Control: private Vary: Accept-Encoding Access-Control-Allow-Origin: * Connection: close

(this is flickr)

What's going on there?

Also, is it not possible to override the header caching directives via jquery somehow?

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"I'm using the third party jsonp library for jquery. In the call to it, you can set cache to true." If that's your only reason for using it, you can use jQuery's built-in JSONP handling, which also lets you set cache: true according to the docs. Obviously if you have another reason for using the plug-in, fair 'nuff, but it sounded like you just needed the caching. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 26 '11 at 6:57
    
No no, I have another need for it, namely better error handling. –  Wesley Jul 26 '11 at 6:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I expect that the services you're calling are returning cache control headers that tell the browser not to cache the response / to expire the cached response very quickly. You should be able to see them in the HTTP messages. Look for Cache-Control and/or Expires, that sort of thing.

Re your edit:

Also, is it not possible to override the header caching directives via jquery somehow?

I don't think so, no, certainly not with JSON-P, which is at its heart a script element being added to the page, so programmatic control over that is going to be extremely limited. Even if it were XHR, frankly, I don't think there's a way to tell the browser to use a cached version that's stale according to its source.

If this is happening within the page lifecycle, you could cache the result yourself in an object on the page, but I'm guessing you're talking about caching between visits to the page (though I can't immediately see why you want to defeat the origin's definition of fresh/stale).

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It appears you are right, 3 out of the 4 are using Expires: –  Wesley Jul 26 '11 at 6:56
    
However, one simply has Cache-Control:private yet it is still not being cached. –  Wesley Jul 26 '11 at 6:56
    
@Wesley: private = "Indicates that all or part of the response message is intended for a single user and MUST NOT be cached by a shared cache." (reference) I wouldn't be surprised if browsers just treated that as non-cacheable. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 26 '11 at 6:58
    
Which I thought would mean the end user can cache it, but a proxy can not. I am an end user and it does not cache. –  Wesley Jul 26 '11 at 7:00
    
@Wesley: Well, apparently the browser is treating it as non-cacheable, as you're seeing it not being cached. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 26 '11 at 7:02

Cache Headers

First off the server responding to your jsonp calls must have some an expiration date in the response headers. As you mentioned you are not in control of how youtube, flickr, etc answer the jsonp calls.

Browser Cache

The browser is caching the calls with acceptable headers for each unique url.

jQuery JSONP Callback and Identifier

jQuery sends two pieces of data that make your URLs unique. If you do do not change these two options, your jsonp calls will never cache. Read more here

  • The actual callback= param value that your json data is padded with. Looks something like this: callback=jQuery_123971236127631276.
  • A unique identifier that makes every URL unique and hence non-cachable. Looks something like this: _=123918712387612398.

Disable unique JSONP Callback

The get param called callback is given a random name generated by jQuery so that many jsonp calls can be fired at once and the responses would not interfere with each other. None the less this must be changed if you wish to cache a certain jsonp call. The attribute jsonpCallback is used to overwrite this feature.

$.jsonp({
            url: url,
            dataType: 'jsonp',
            data: $.extend({ url: options.dataUrl, method: lookupData.method }, fixedOptions),


            // Note: using success : function(){ ... } will not be 
            // called if 'jsonpCallback' attribute is set. 
            jsonpCallback : 'myCallback',
 });

Disable unique URL Identifer

This URL Identifier is set in the param list so that each call is unique, looks like: ...&_=1231981238712. Removing this feature can be done by adding attribute cache : true to your options.

$.jsonp({
            url: url,
            dataType: 'jsonp',
            data: $.extend({ url: options.dataUrl, method: lookupData.method }, fixedOptions),

            // Note: using success : function(){ ... } will not be 
            // called if 'jsonpCallback' attribute is set. 
            jsonpCallback : 'myCallback',

            // Disables: ... &_=1231829812386
            cache : true
 });
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