Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a class that takes an implicit parameter which is used by functions called inside class methods. i want to be able to either override that implicit parameter and have both the class and its inherited parent class have a reference to the same new implicit object.

making the Parent implicit a var and setting that to a new value successfully overrides the implicit in the parent, but not the child.

(this is similar to scala: override implicit parameter to constructor, except there is the added restriction that the override affect both child class and parent class.)

for example:

def outside(implicit x: Boolean) {
  println(x)
}

class Parent(implicit var x: Boolean) {
  def setImplicit() {
    x = true
  }

  def callOutside {
    outside
  }
}

class Child(implicit x: Boolean) extends Parent {
  override def callOutside {
    outside
  }
}

and then:

scala> val a = new Parent()(false)
a: Parent = Parent@c351f6d

scala> a.callOutside
false

scala> a.setImplicit()

scala> a.callOutside
true // <-- sees the new implicit correctly


scala> val b = new Child()(false)
b: Child = Child@68331dd0

scala> b.callOutside
false

scala> b.setImplicit()

scala> b.callOutside
false // <-- wrong, desire "true" instead

is there any way to get the desired behavior? doing things like making both Parent and Child implicit be a var doesn't seem to work. thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

You could just

class Parent(x0: Boolean) {
  implicit var x = x0
  ...
}

if you didn't really need the class parameter to be implicit. I'll assume that you do.

One alternative is to put the implicits on the companion object. Like so:

class Parent(x0: Boolean) {
  implicit var x = x0
  def setImplicit { x = true }
  def outsideCall { outside }
}
object Parent {
  def apply(implicit x: Boolean) = new Parent(x)
}

class Child(x0: Boolean) extends Parent(x0) {
  def callOutside { outside }
}
object Child {
  def apply(implicit x: Boolean) = new Child(x)
}

Alternatively, you could create a private main constructor for Child (decorated in some way so it's not ambiguous with the implicit) and use an implicit on a secondary constructor:

class Child private (b: Boolean, u: Unit) extends Parent()(b) {
  def this()(implicit x: Boolean) = this(x,())
  def callOutside { outside }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.