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I have a BigInteger number, for example beyond 264. Now i want to calculate the logarithm of that BigInteger number, but BigInteger.log() is not present. How do I calculate it?

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Does it happen to be base 2? –  Thomas Mueller Jul 26 '11 at 8:58
    
yes..it can be base 2. –  RAVITEJA SATYAVADA Jul 26 '11 at 9:01
    
Do you need all value or just integer part of it (as in division)? –  RiaD Jul 3 '13 at 22:45

4 Answers 4

If you want to support arbitrarily big integers, it's not safe to just do

Math.log(bigInteger.doubleValue());

because this breaks if the argument exceeds the double range (about 308 decimal digits).

Here's my recipe:

private static final double LOG2 = Math.log(2.0);

/**
 * Computes the natural logarithm of a BigInteger. Works for really big
 * integers (practically unlimited)
 * 
 * @param val Argument, positive integer
 * @return Natural logarithm, as in <tt>Math.log()</tt>
 */
public static double logBigInteger(BigInteger val) {
    int blex = val.bitLength() - 1022; // any value in 60..1023 is ok
    if (blex > 0)
        val = val.shiftRight(blex);
    double res = Math.log(val.doubleValue());
    return blex > 0 ? res + blex * LOG2 : res;
}

I've tested it with really big BigIntegers (more than 500000 decimal digits), and the maximum relative error has always been below 5.0e-16, which is in the order of the double precision.


Some sample code, in case you want to test it yourself:

    public static double testLogBigInteger(int[] factors, int[] exponents) {
    double l1 = 0;
    BigInteger bi = BigInteger.ONE;
    for (int i = 0; i < factors.length; i++) {
        int exponent = exponents[i];
        int factor = factors[i];
        if (factor <= 1)
            continue;
        for (int n = 0; n < exponent; n++) {
            bi = bi.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(factor));
        }
        l1 += Math.log(factor) * exponent;
    }
    double l2 = logBigInteger(bi);
    double err = Math.abs((l2 - l1) / l1);
    int decdigits = (int) (l1 / Math.log(10) + 0.5);
    System.out.printf("e=%e digitss=%d \n", err, decdigits);
    return err;
}

public static void testManyTries(int tries) {
    int[] f = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 };
    int[] e = { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 };
    Random r = new Random();
    double maxerr = 0;
    for (int n = 0; n < tries; n++) {
        for (int i = 0; i < f.length; i++) {
            f[i] = r.nextInt(100000) + 2;
            e[i] = r.nextInt(1000) + 1;
        }
        double err = testLogBigInteger(f, e);
        if (err > maxerr)
            maxerr = err;
    }
    System.out.printf("Max err: %e \n", maxerr);
}
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I had some help from google but apparently you don't need to apply log to your very big BigInteger numbers directly, since it can be broken down in the following way:

928 = 1000 * 0.928
lg 928 = lg 1000 * lg 0.928 = 3 + lg 0.928

Your problem is therefore reduced to the computation/approximation of logarithms that allow for arbitrary increasing precision, maybe math.stackexchange.com?

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How accurate do you need it to be? If you only need 15 digits of accuracy you can do

BigInteger bi =
double log = Math.log(bi.doubleValue());
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1  
NO...........it should be very accurate.. –  RAVITEJA SATYAVADA Jul 26 '11 at 8:59
3  
Define "very accurate" Log produces irrational numbers which would require infinite precision. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 26 '11 at 9:02
    
Actually i has to use the log value of that biginteger as boundary to do some other opeartions...\ –  RAVITEJA SATYAVADA Jul 26 '11 at 9:03
1  
@user - you haven't answered Peter's question. How much accuracy do you really need? ("As much as possible" or "very accurate" are not sensible answers.) –  Stephen C Jul 26 '11 at 9:18
1  
Apart from accuracy, this has problems for veryBigIntegers that dont fit in a Double (say 13^333) –  leonbloy Oct 4 '12 at 17:37

Convert it into a BigDecimal liek this:

new BigDecimal(val); // where val is a BigInteger  

and call log from BigDecimalUtils on it :D

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1  
where can i find BigDecimalUtils ? –  wutzebaer Sep 8 '13 at 13:01
    
Google for it, there are some open source libraries that include such a class, e.g. on numericalmethod.com –  Angel O'Sphere Sep 11 '13 at 12:55

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