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I've have a library of data access objects and am tasked with designing the logic layer. In this layer, I have access to the core data model, which I need to use to create Profile objects that can be passed to the UI for rendering.

Every object in the data model that needs an equivalent Profile object derives from the type Page. So ideally I need to write one method that accepts a Page as a parameter and returns a Profile. It's not quite as simple as this, however, because the Profile objects are split into groups of Apps, which the user can enable.

I've tried various different approaches (and keep on deleting the whole lot and starting again!), but here's the solution I'm trying at the moment:

public interface IApp
{
    //should be static, but interfaces cannot define static properties
    //so this instance property will return a private static field
    Dictionary<Type, IProfileCreator> Profiles { get; }

    //other things the App contains that isn't relevant to the profiles
}

public interface IProfile
{
    Page page { get; set; }
}

public interface IProfileCreator
{
    IProfile Create(Page page);
}

public class ProfileCreator<TProfile> where TProfile : IProfile, new()
{
    IProfile IProfileCreator.Create(Page page)
    {
        return Create(page);
    }

    public TProfile Create(Page page)
    {
        //constructor will have to be blank because of the new() constraint
        TProfile profile = new TProfile();
        profile.Page = page;
        return profile;
    }
}

I have to create 24 fairly big Profile classes for different pages, so I just want to make sure I'm doing it the best way I can before I start coding away. As you can see this design has a few flaws, but is there a better way of doing this? Has anyone tried a similar thing before (this situation can't be that rare, can it)?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Have a look at this Factoy PAttern (source):

  abstract class ProfileFactory 
    { 
        public abstract IProfile GetProfile(Page p); //Factory Method Declaration 
    }

class concreteFactoryforProfile1 : ProfileFactory 
    {
    public override IProfile GetProfile(Page p) //Factory Method Implementation 
            { 
                //data access stuff...
                return new Profile() { Page = p }; 
            } 
    }

class concreteFactoryforProfile2 : ProfileFactory 
    {
    public override IProfile GetProfile(Page p) //Factory Method Implementation 
            { 
                //other data access stuff...
                return new Profile() { Page = p };
            } 
    }


interface IProfile 
    { 
        Page Page { get; set; } 
        //other properties can come here
    }

class Profile : IProfile
    { 
        public  Page Page { get; set; }
        //other properties can come here
    }


public class Test
{
    void Main()
    {

        ProfileFactory[] objFactories = new ProfileFactory[2];
        objFactories[0] = new concreteFactoryforProfile1();
        objFactories[1] = new concreteFactoryforProfile2();
        foreach (ProfileFactory objFactory in objFactories)
        {
            IProfile objProfile = objFactory.GetProfile(this.Page);
            Page p = objProfile.Page;
        }
    }
}

Then two App might have the same type of Object, your implementation of the creation of the object will be done only once.

If you need further details, please ask.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for you answer. I'm pretty confused by this though. Could you expand a bit more on your example usage in the Main() method? –  Connell Watkins Jul 26 '11 at 11:05
    
I do not know what to add, it depends exclusively on the way your apps are using their profiles. the thing here is to use a factory because instanciation of a particular class is too complex. –  Arthis Jul 26 '11 at 11:07
    
It's just twigged.. why didn't I see this 3 hours ago?! In fact why didn't I think of this in the first place?! Thank you –  Connell Watkins Jul 26 '11 at 15:14

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