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In Git, if we have the following command:

$ git remote add myapp git@github.com:xyz/myapp.git

What does this command mean? And, does it differ if we replace myapp with origin?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

Git remote means you link a git URI to a name, to a label.

If git@github.com:xyz/myapp.git is the URI you'll want to push to, then if you write

git remote add myapp git@github.com:xyz/myapp.git

instead of

git remote add origin git@github.com:xyz/myapp.git you'll have to modify the push command too, like this:

git push myapp

This is not always true, you can set up a remote for some other repo because you want to have fast access to it.

For example if you'll get a lot of pull request from the same user/repo you will want to add a remote for that repo so you can inspect changes made to it(the repo linked by the remote).

Please read:

http://progit.org/book/ch2-5.html -> if you read this you'll understand git remotes completely

http://www.kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-remote.html

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Well the above command essentially is to tell git where the remote repository you intend to check on .

If you peek into the config file under .git you will see something like ::

[remote "origin"]
url = git@github.com:xxx/xxx.git

That would be [remote "myapp"] in your case .

EDITED ::

You won't modify the default push "path", you'll just compress these commands: git remote rm origin and git remote add myapp ,

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1  
Wrong: you won't modify the default push "path", you'll just compress these commands: git remote rm origin and git remote add myapp <URI>, so it's like you'll delete the remote 'origin' and create 'myapp' –  Paul Jul 26 '11 at 9:51

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