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I'm using the following statement in Java:

Arrays.fill(mynewArray, oldArray.Length, size, -1);

Please suggest the C# equivalent.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Frank van Puffelen, Serge Ballesta, Artjom B., pascalhein Aug 9 '14 at 14:43

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I don't know of anything in the framework which does that, but it's easy enough to implement:

// Note: start is inclusive, end is exclusive (as is conventional
// in computer science)
public static void Fill<T>(T[] array, int start, int end, T value)
{
    if (array == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
    }
    if (start < 0 || start >= end)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("fromIndex");
    }
    if (end >= array.Length)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("toIndex");
    }
    for (int i = start; i < end; i++)
    {
        array[i] = value;
    }
}

Or if you want to specify the count instead of the start/end:

public static void Fill<T>(T[] array, int start, int count, T value)
{
    if (array == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
    }
    if (count < 0)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("count");
    }
    if (start + count >= array.Length)
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("count");
    }
    for (var i = start; i < start + count; i++)
    {
        array[i] = value;
    }
}
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I hope my edit is justified.. or otherwise name variable to uptoIndex –  nawfal Nov 15 '12 at 23:27
    
@nawfal: No, it was deliberately (although not consistently) exclusive. I've tidied it up and added an alternative. –  Jon Skeet Nov 16 '12 at 6:47
    
Jon, why do you check for exceptional cases and throw yourself when the clr would do that? I'm a bit puzzled by this kind of design. Wouldn't only the second conditional check (in both your examples) alone suffice? –  nawfal Nov 20 '12 at 9:24
1  
@nawfal: The CLR will throw different exceptions. Given that these are method arguments, the exceptions thrown should be ArgumentExceptions, IMO. That shows that it's the calling code at fault, not a problem within the method itself. –  Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 9:39

Try like this

Array.Copy(source, target, 5);

For more information here

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3  
That doesn't do the same thing as fill. –  Jon Skeet Jul 26 '11 at 9:51
    
but it is not target array to copy...it is taking length..mynewArray is int[] –  usr021986 Jul 26 '11 at 9:52

It seems like you would like to do something more like this

int[] bar = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
int newSize = 10;
int[] foo = Enumerable.Range(0, newSize).Select(i => i < bar.Length ? bar[i] : -1).ToArray();

Creating an new larger array with the old values and filling the extra.

For a simple fill try

int[] foo = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).Select(i => -1).ToArray();

or a sub range

int[] foo = new int[10];
Enumerable.Range(5, 9).Select(i => foo[i] = -1);
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