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This is a very contrived example as it's not easy to explain the context in which I have ended up implementing this solution. However, if anyone can answer why this particular peculiarity happens, I'd be grateful.

The example:

class A(dict):  
    def __init__(self):
    	self['a'] = 'success'

    def __getitem__(self, name):
    	print 'getitem'
    	return dict.__getitem__(name)

class B(object):
    def __init__(self):
    	self._a = A()
    	setattr(self, '__getitem__', self._a.__getitem__) 

b = B()
c = b['a']

This outputs:

c = b['a']
TypeError: 'B' object is unsubscriptable

Even though it's a bizarre way of doing this (clearly subclassing would be more logical), why doesn't it find the method I have explicitly set?

If I do this:

dir(b)

I get this:

['__class__', '__delattr__', '__dict__', '__doc__', '__getattribute__', '__getitem__', '__hash__', '__init__', '__module__', '__new__', '__reduce__', '__reduce_ex__', '__repr__', '__setattr__', '__str__', '__weakref__', '_a']

The same issue occurs with other methods such as __iter__. What is it about explicitly defining this method that works?

share|improve this question
    
Hint: if it's not easy to explain, it's not a good idea. Try describing your goal instead of a contrived route to the goal. Someone might be able to give you something that is less contrived. –  S.Lott Mar 25 '09 at 18:23
    
Ok, fair enough, I'll post a question about the actual problem I'm solving and let you figure out what you think the best way of handling this is. –  Dan Mar 26 '09 at 10:16
    
Dan: Can you post a link for people who have arrived at this question and are curious what the context was? –  MatrixFrog Aug 9 '09 at 20:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

When you use brackets [] python looks in the class. You must set the method in the class.

Here's your code adapted:

class A(dict):  
    def __init__(self):
        self['a'] = 'success'

    def __getitem__(self, name):
        print 'getitem!'
        return dict.__getitem__(self, name)

class B(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._a = A()
        B.__getitem__ = self._a.__getitem__

b = B()
c = b['a']
share|improve this answer
    
Hang on, you're pointing a class method to an instance method, doesn't that mean it'll point to the same instance for all instances of B? –  Dan Mar 26 '09 at 17:50
    
@Dan: yes. getitem only works for the entire class. There is no per-instance getitem. –  nosklo Mar 26 '09 at 18:03

This is because you can't override special class methods on the fly.

I wasn't able to find a reference about this but is basically because they are class methods and are not allowed to be instance methods.

share|improve this answer
    
you can override them on the fly, the mistake was that Dan messed with instance methods instead of class methods. –  Toni Ruža Mar 25 '09 at 20:50
    
spot on, I didn't understand the difference between instance methods and class methods in this sense. thanks. –  Dan Mar 26 '09 at 10:47

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