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I have a problem where an app compiles fine in debug mode with all optimization turned off. But the moment I compile for release it prints out unresolved link errors.

The functions in question are the following:

template <typename T>
T & Block::val(size_t offset) 
{
    return *(reinterpret_cast<T*>(_data + offset)); 
}

template <typename T>
const T & Block::val(size_t offset) const 
{ 
    return *(reinterpret_cast<T*>(_data + offset)); 
}

And the errors I'm getting all look like:

undefined reference to `unsigned long long& Block::val<unsigned long long>(unsigned long)'

What might be causing this?

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Minimal testcase needed. Many reasons possible. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 10:24
    
Odd, moving them from the source file into the header file and it compiles fine. These are template methods not standalone by the way. –  Matt Jul 26 '11 at 10:26
    
Are you using gcc 4.6? –  cschwan Jul 26 '11 at 10:28
    
Need minimal testcase. Reasons possible are many. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 10:29
    
The version of gcc that I'm using is 4.52 –  Matt Jul 26 '11 at 10:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You normally wouldn't put template implementations in a .cpp but rather a .h or .inl which is included from a .h, it could be that the debug build of the .o is more liberal with the symbols it exports.

Run nm on the debug and release builds of the .o and diff the symbols.

Templates are unusual in linkers because of the One Definition Rule. When it comes to templates, where the body is in the header, this results in multiple equivalent definitions, one for each translation unit. The linker lets them all be until the last moment, where it selects one arbitrarily and discards the others.

I am guessing here, but I suspect that when you compile without optimisations the body is treated like normal, but when optimisations are on the compiler spends a bit of extra effort determining that this body is not visible in other translation units and declines to export it.

Look up extern templates.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean You normally wouldn't put template implementations in a .cxx but rather a .hpp or .inl.hh which is included from a .hxx, it could be that the debug build of the .obj is more liberal with the symbols it exports.? Not meaning to offend you, but why not use the generic terms "source file", "header", "object file", "library"? –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 10:49
    
Not meaning to offend you but who cares? –  spraff Jul 26 '11 at 10:58
    
Dunno. Just think it's a suboptimal way of talking about C++. Just like. It's a very localized dialect, used by only a subset of a community, and basically invalid for the other part of it. A bit as if you talk about K's and V's and C's S's, and what you really mean is kilowatts, velocity, cars and spark plugs. I prefer the more generic and equally precise wording, as also exercised by e.g. David Vandevoorde and Nicolai Josuttis. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 11:13
    
File naming conventions are not a dialect of the language. This is of absolutely no consequence. What matters is clarity of communication and I reckon .cpp is easier to read than "C plus plus source file" –  spraff Jul 26 '11 at 11:19
    
Nobody mentioned "C plus plus source file", that's your own strange idea. Just "source file". And I find it indeed more clear, when I read the part that says 'cpp', I think of C Preprocessor, and this has more historical weight than some IDE's default file extensions. But okay, you have your stance and don't want to discuss it; you define your own view of "more clear" automatically as everyones view of "more clear". Just thought it could potentially improve your post. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 11:24

Odd, moving them from the source file into the header file and it compiles fine.

This is not odd in the slightest. Function template definitions belong to header files since day one. Do not put them in sources. If you do, the compiler won't see them at instantiation time.

share|improve this answer
    
Only templates that are to be used in more than one unit belong into a header. "Source unit implementation detail" templates don't. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 10:43
    
It it wasn't being used in more than one unit, there would not be a linker error. –  spraff Jul 26 '11 at 10:56
    
@spraff: That has not necessarily something to do with it: template<typename> void foo(); int main () { foo<int>(); }. One compilation unit, still linker errors. More minimal example: int main(){int x(); x();}. –  phresnel Jul 26 '11 at 11:08

Let me look into my crystal ball (better help available when you stop ignoring comments):

You have enclosed your templates with #ifdef DEBUG or similar.

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