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I'm on learning for C#.

I heared C# is one of the most constructible language. so would you guys make my code more elegant and efficient?

public class ISO639
{
    public enum ISO639Code
    {
        Afrikaans,                      //af
        Albanian,                       //sq
        Amharic,                        //am

        ...

        Yiddish,                        //yi
        Unknown                         
    }


    public static string GetISO639CodeString(ISO639.ISO639Code l)
    {
        switch (l)
        {
            case ISO639Code.English: return "en";
            case ISO639Code.Japanese: return "ja";

            ...

            case ISO639Code.Hebrew: return "he";
            default: return "";
        }


    public static ISO639.ISO639Code GetISO39CodeValue(string s)
    {

        switch (s)
        {
            case "ko" : return ISO639Code.Korean;
            case "en" : return ISO639Code.English;

            ...

            case "hu" : return ISO639Code.Hungarian;
            default: return ISO639Code.Unknown;
        }
    }
}

Here is a my class ISO639. This class provides enum for ISO639 code, but I need a type conversion on from ISO639 enum to plain string. (ex. ISO639.ISO639Code.Italian => "it"). I also need a type conversion from plain string to ISO639 enum. (ex. "it" => ISO639.ISO639Code.Italian).

Is there a more efficient coding style for that?

share|improve this question
    
Most flexible approach that I know for enumeration like functionality are enumeration classes -> lostechies.com/jimmybogard/2008/08/12/enumeration-classes But I doubt you need that. Adding just fyi. –  Arnis L. Jul 26 '11 at 12:01

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can add standard System.ComponentModel.Description attribute to each enum entry and then read it.

public enum ISO639Code       
{ 
  [Description("af")]
  Afrikaans
}

public static class EnumExtensions
{
    // Extension method to read Description value
    public static string GetDescription(this Enum currentEnum)
    {
         var fi = currentEnum.GetType().GetField(currentEnum.ToString()); 
         var da = (DescriptionAttribute)Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(fi, typeof(DescriptionAttribute)); 
         return da != null ? da.Description : currentEnum.ToString();
     } 
}

// **How-to read it**
ISO639Code isoCode = ISO639Code.Afrikaans;

// this will returns "af"
string isoDescription = isoCode.GetDescription(); 

EDIT:

    string searchFor = "af"; 
    ISO639Code foundEntry;

    // Loop through all entries descriptions       
    var allEntries = Enum.GetValues(typeof(ISO639Code));
    foreach (var entry in allEntries)
    {
        // If you will extract this as separate method and use it for search not only loop
        // through the all entries - you can put here is yield return description
        var currentEntry = ((ISO639Code)entry);
        string description = currentEntry.GetDescription();
        if (description == searchFor)
        {
            foundEntry = currentEntry;
            break;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
good. so how do mapping "af" to Afrikaans directly? should i search all enum memebers through *.GetDescription? –  mjk6026 Jul 26 '11 at 11:19
    
You want to assign descriptions dynamically or search through the all enum entries by description value? In such case you have to implement method GetByDescription(this Enum currentEnum, string description) –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 11:31
    
i want to like... ISO639Code l,m; k.SetValue("af"); m=ISO639Code.Afrikaans; if(k==m){messagebox.show("equal.");} this. –  mjk6026 Jul 26 '11 at 11:36
    
To search by description value you have to implement method GetByDescription(this Enum currentEnum, string description) and loop through all the Enum.GetValues(currentEnum.GetType()) –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 11:37
    
@mjk6026: I don't got your question, could you please rephrase –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 11:39

Sure. You can use attributes:

public enum ISO639Code
{
    [CodeString("af")] Afrikaans,
    [CodeString("sq")] Albanian,    
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ooh, that looks nice! –  Jamie Dixon Jul 26 '11 at 10:37
    
Anton, just a question. How to use this attributes? i.e. from another class. I think this looks pretty clean. –  Randolf R-F Jul 26 '11 at 10:37
5  
@Sheldon you need to use reflection and Attribute.GetCustomAttribute, usually caching this data somewhere in-memory to avoid calculating it each time –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 10:40
    
i have a same question with sheldon. –  mjk6026 Jul 26 '11 at 10:40
2  
Take a look at DescriptionAttribute: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 26 '11 at 10:41

I suggest you to use C# extension methods to enums, they allow you to add whatever logic you want.

For example, see http://pietschsoft.com/post/2008/07/c-enhance-enums-using-extension-methods.aspx

share|improve this answer

Use dictionary, for example: new Dictionary<ISO639Code, string>.

share|improve this answer
    
meh; the switch is faster –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 10:38
2  
@Marc, I think OP asks about readability... –  Kirill Polishchuk Jul 26 '11 at 10:40
    
true, but in many ways the existing code is very readable. It is painfully obvious how it maps. Of course maintainability is a sore point, as you could easily swap or typo. –  Marc Gravell Jul 26 '11 at 10:49

I'd simply store the information in a dictionary-like object. This way you can reference the name by key and get the value directly.

share|improve this answer

You have an enum:

 public enum ISO639Code
 {
    Afrikaans = 1,                      
    Albanian  = 2,                       
    Amharic   = 3, 

etc.

Create a database table:

 ISO639Id   int   PK,
 ISO639Code char(2)

Where the ISO639Id maps to the value of the enum.

In code you'd want a ISO630 Class containing Id and Code values read from the database. (You can load this once and then cache it in memory.)

The beauty of this approach, is it can be easily extended so that if in future you wanted to store more pieces of information for each ISO639 code, you could simply add another field.

share|improve this answer

Look at System.Globailzation namespace. The functionality you require looks to be already implemented there. At worst you can see the architecture and technique applied in the .Net framework to solve a very similar problem.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for malio. but i want to know about C#, not .net framework namespace. –  mjk6026 Jul 26 '11 at 10:49
    
But the point is there are normally better ways of representing some structures, but it depends entirely on how they are to be used. For languages, the CultureInfo classes exist. –  Deanna Jul 26 '11 at 11:06
    
oh that's a good advice. i'll mind it. thanks. –  mjk6026 Jul 26 '11 at 11:23

Enumerations are really good to work in code, as they are really strongly typed and make refactoring easier. Follow these steps:

  1. Use attributes for whatever extra information you want to attach to an enum. Usually this is a simple Description attribute. Something like:

    public enum IsoCodes { [Description("af")] Africans = 0, [Description("am")] Americans = 1 }

Then write some extension methods to convert strings and integers to and from this enum:

public static string GetDescription(this Enum value)
        {
            var entries = value.ToString().Split(FlagEnumSeparatorCharacter);

            var description = new string[entries.Length];

            for (var i = 0; i < entries.Length; i++)
            {
                var fieldInfo = value.GetType().GetField(entries[i].Trim());
                var attributes = fieldInfo.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false) as DescriptionAttribute[];
                description[i] = (attributes.Length > 0) ? attributes[0].Description : entries[i].Trim();
            }

            return String.Join(", ", description);
        }

public static int GetValue(this Enum value)
    {
        return (int)value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString()).GetRawConstantValue();
    }

    public static T ToEnum<T>(this string value)
    {
        if (typeof(T).BaseType.Name != typeof(Enum).Name)
        {
            throw new Exception("Not an enum");
        }
        return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), value, true);
    }

    public static T ToEnum<T>(this int value)
    {
        if (typeof(T).BaseType.Name != typeof(Enum).Name)
        {
            throw new Exception("Not an enum");
        }
        return (T)Enum.ToObject(typeof(T), value);
    }

Now use your enums as you like.

share|improve this answer

I would go with having ISO639Code as class instead of enum:

public class ISO639Code
{
    public string Value { get; set ; }
    public string Code { get; set; }

    public ISO639Code()
    {
        this.Value = "";
        this.Code = "";
    }

    public ISO639Code(string value, string code)
        : this()
    {
        this.Value = value;
        this.Code = code;
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (obj != null)
        {
            if (obj is string)
                return obj.ToString().Equals(this.Value, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
            if (obj is ISO639Code)
                return ((ISO639Code)obj).Value.Equals(this.Value, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
        }
        return false;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.Value.GetHashCode();
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this.Value;
    }
}

Then have global List<ISO639Code> with all possible codes, and to find specific code based on code name or value, just search for this in the List.

Personally, I prefer this over tweaking the enum.

share|improve this answer
    
I believe Code property should be readonly, because it not makes sense to change code whilst entity life cycle (for this particular case) –  sll Jul 26 '11 at 11:06
    
Valid argument, this code is given as example - not sure about the full scope here though. –  Shadow Wizard Jul 26 '11 at 11:47

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